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The Chicago Manual of Style Guide: Books & Single Printed Works

This guide will help you format your paper according to the CMoS 17th (2017) edition.

Books

 

Basic Format for Book
 
Author LastName, FirstName. Year. Title of Work: Subtitle. (Location: Publisher).
 
  • Italicize title of work
 
One Author
 
In-Text Reference (with page numbers)
 
(Lee 2021, 56-73)
 
Reference List
 
Lee, Fung-Har. 2021. Play and Imagination in Children with Autism. New York: Teachers College

Press.

 
Two Authors
 
  • Use and before last author
  • Use commas to separate authors in Reference List
 
(Xue and Hong 2020, 25-42)
 
Reference List
 
Xue, Susan E., and Joann M. Hong. 2020. Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the

Brain of Synesthesia. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

 

Three Authors

 

Use commas to separate authors

(Horton, Hinton, and Kuhn 2021, 118)
 
Four or More Authors
 
(NSM et al. 2013, 147-149)
 
Use all authors names in Reference List.
 
Reference List
 
NSM (Long Island Symposium on Motivation), Jeffrey A. French, Alan C. Kamil, Daniel W. Leger, and

Martin Daly. 2001. Evolutionary Psychology and Motivation. Lincoln, Neb: University of Nebraska Press.

 
Please refer to the Chicago Manual of Style for further information on citing books or parts of books
One Author
 
Note
 
3. Pamela J. Wolfberg, Play and Imagination in Children with Autism (New York: Teachers College Press, 2009), 56-73.
 
Bibliography
 
Wolfberg, Pamela J. Play and imagination in children with Autism. New York: Teachers College Press,

2009.

 
Two Authors
 
Note
 
18. Richard E. Cytowic, and David M. Eagleman, Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2009), 25-42.
 
Bibliography
 
Cytowic, Richard E., and David M. Eagleman. Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of

Synesthesia. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2009.

 
Edited Book One or More Editors
 
Note
 
23. Jodi A. Quas, and Robyn R. Fivush, eds., Emotions and Memory in Development: Biologocal, Cognitive, and Social Considerations (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2009), 98.
 
Bibliography
 
Quas, Jodi A., and Robyn R. Fivush, eds., Emotions and Memory in Development: Biologocal,

Cognitive, and Social Considerations. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2009.

 
Article or Chapter in an Edited Book
 
Note
 
12. Laurie Sperry, and Gary Mesibov, "Translating Early Intervention into Positive Outcomes," in Growing up with Autism: Working with School-age Children and Adolescents, eds. Robin L. Gabriels, and Dina E. Hill (New York, NY: Guilford Press, 2007), 227.
 
Bibliography
 
Sperry, Laurie, and Gary Mesibov. "Translating Early Intervention into Positive Outcomes," in Growing

up with Autism: Working with School-age Children and Adolescents, edited by Robin L. Gabriels, and Dina E. Hill, 223-246. New York, NY: Guilford Press, 2007.

Formatting

The Chicago Style footnote system uses superscript numbers. These numbers should be placed at the end of the sentence (or clause) in which the cited material appears. Use your software's formatting menu to change the number to a superscript.

Footnotes and endnotes should be detailed on first references; second and later references then take a short form that uses either the author’s name and a page number or the Latin term ibid and a page number if needed.

Ask your instructor what kind of notes you should use.

  1. Footnotes are placed at the bottom of each page.
  2. Endnotes are placed at the end of the paper.

Word-processing software supports either approach, but footnotes are the more frequently used method.

Chicago Style lists of references should be alphabetized by the author’s surname, and presented as a “Bibliography” page that may include all sources you consulted. Ask your instructor what your list of references should include—all the sources you consulted, or only those you cite in the paper?