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Instructional Media Center: Lincoln Exhibits and Events

Upcoming Lincoln Events for March 21- May 3, 2013

Programs sponsored by B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library, LIU Post, Long Island University and partners.

Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War is part of a sesquicentennial observation of the American Civil War at LIU. The exhibit and associated events at LIU Post are free and open to the public.

  • Exhibit, March 21, 2013

    Opening of the Exhibit: Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, Hutchins Gallery, LIU Post library (lower level)

    Using the Constitution as the cohesive thread, "Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War" offers a fresh and innovative perspective on Lincoln that focuses on his struggle to meet the political and constitutional challenges of the Civil War. Organized thematically, the exhibition explores how Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war - the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties. The traveling exhibit is composed of informative panels featuring photographic reproductions of original documents, including a draft of Lincoln's first inaugural speech, the Emancipation Proclamation and the Thirteenth Amendment. Visitors will leave the exhibition with a more complete understanding of Abraham Lincoln as president and the Civil War as the nation's gravest constitutional crisis.

    Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, a traveling exhibition for libraries, was organized by the National Constitution Center and the American Library Association Public Programs Office. The traveling exhibition has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Lincoln: the Constitution and the Civil War is based on an exhibition of the same name developed by the National Constitution Center. The B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library is the selected host library and recipient of the grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH.)

    Other exhibits in the library:

    Original art work
    Includes works inspired by the Civil Rights Movement of the 60's, by internationally renowned artist Dan Christoffel.
    Hutchins Gallery, LIU Post library (lower level)

    Educational exhibits in main lobby of library:

    African Americans and the Civil War. An exhibit by ASALH, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, and supplemented with resources from the collections of the Library of Congress and the B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library.

    Scenes from the Civil War. An exhibit by the Library of Congress. Supplemented by resources from the B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library and Civil War memorabilia from the library and private collections. An original "Lincoln pardon" document and related original movie posters 1940-1962 are also available for viewing at the Special Collections Department of the library.

    Lecture:

    Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context, and Memory.

    The Emancipation Proclamation is responsible both for Lincoln's being hailed as the Great Emancipator and for his being pilloried by those who consider his once-radical effort at emancipation insufficient. Holzer examines the impact of Lincoln's announcement at the moment of its creation, and then as its meaning has changed over time.

    Speaker: Harold Holzer, Thursday, March 21st, 2013, 12:30 PM , Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall, LIU Post

    Lecture supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

     

  • Lecture /Presentation

    The Legacy of Marian Anderson

    Marian Anderson was one of the most celebrated singers of the twentieth century. She became an important figure in the struggle for black artists to overcome racial prejudice in the United States during the mid-twentieth century. In 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution refused permission for Anderson to sing to an integrated audience in Constitution Hall. Instead, with the aid of Eleanor Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939. She sang before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. In 1955, Anderson broke the color barrier by becoming the first African-American to perform with the Metropolitan Opera. In 1958 she was officially designated delegate to the United Nations, a formalization of her role as "goodwill ambassador" of the U.S., and in 1972 she was awarded the UN Peace Prize. Anderson may have been a reluctant participant in the civil rights movement, but greatness was thrust upon her. A generation of African-American singers is indebted to her for blazing the trail towards equality.

    Speaker: Marc Courtade, Thursday, April 4, 2013, 12:30 PM, Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall, LIU Post

    Lecture/Presentation supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

  • Film Screening and Discussion

    Young Mr. Lincoln

    Facilitator: Prof. Philip Harwood, Friday, April 5, 12 noon, The Port Washington Library, NY

    Sponsored by: The Port Washington Public Library, NY

  • Lecture/Presentation

    You Are There at Lincoln's New York City Funeral

    "You Are There at Lincoln's New York City Funeral" is a unique multi-media presentation that transports the audience back in time to April, 1865, and makes them eyewitnesses to this great and sad event. This is accomplished by converting contemporary newspaper reports into the present tense, and showing old photos, prints, and woodcuts. Sound effects and modern recordings of music heard during the funeral procession and the lying in state at City Hall help cement the mood. Following the presentation, Mr. Sloan will show some of the sites along the route of the procession as they appeared in 1865 and as they appear today. Ironically, many of them have interesting connections to Lincoln, Mrs. Lincoln, and John Wilkes Booth.

    Speaker: Richard Sloan, Tuesday, April 9th, 2013, 12:30 PM, Hillwood Commons Cinema, LIU Post

    Lecture/Presentation supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

  • Reading and Discussion

    Lincoln and the Civil War. A Reading and Discussion Series by the New York Council for the Humanities.

    Facilitator: James Coll, (4 sessions during April, 2013, Mondays 8, 15, 22, 29 @ 2 PM)
    Hutchins Gallery of library, LIU Post

    Sponsored by: The LIU Post library and The Post Library Association with the support of a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities. Please note that the grant from NYCH is pending approval.

  • Movie Discussion

    Abraham Lincoln on Film

    Speaker: Prof. Philip Harwood

    Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall, LIU Post Monday, April 22, 12:30 PM

    Program supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

  • Music and Poetry

    Lincoln Poetry and Music by Long Islanders

    Presenters: LICA - Long Island Composers Alliance, Saturday, April 27, 3 PM
    Hillwood Commons Lecture Hall, LIU Post

    Participants will include Lincoln scholar and philanthropist Lewis E. Lehrman; poets Jud Newborn and Maxwell Corydon Wheat, Jr.; composers Leonard Lehrman, Herbert Feldman, Herbert Rothgarber, Marga Richter, Julie Mandel, and the Metropolitan Philharmonic Chorus with soloist Helene Williams - among others.

    This event is sponsored by the Long Island Composers Alliance (LICA), the Professor Edgar H. Lehrman Memorial Foundation, the Metropolitan Philharmonic Chorus, and Long Island University