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Archives and Special Collections: Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Archives and Special Collections is a repository for materials contained in a variety of formats: books, manuscripts, correspondence, journals, photographs, posters, maps, original drawings, theatre programs, archival documents, and other materials.

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Long Island Places Finding Aid

Long Island, stretching some 120 miles from New York City into the Atlantic Ocean, is divided into four areas: Brooklyn, Queens, Nassau and Suffolk. Within these groupings are a myriad of towns and villages, communities large and small, past and present. They are replete with histories, legends and traditions, hidden lore, persistent mysteries and local characteristics that continue to stimulate researchers. The following annotated list of articles in periodicals demonstrates the variety and depth of information available. Soon, a listing of books and pamphlets with the same local focus will be posted on this site.

Periodicals covered in this index:
      American Heritage Journal of Long Island History Long Island Forum Long Island Heritage Long Island Historical Journal

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Nassau County -- Glen Cove

A Long Island Heritage Town: Glen Clove, The City on the Sound / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.5-7; Apr. 1985.
A collection of articles about Glen Cove. The article gives detailed history of Glen Cove, from its inception in 1664 to present day. Includes role it played in Revolutionary War. Images: LIRR Steamship; Glen Cove Highshcool graduating class; Glen Street).
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
A Were-Wolf in Glen Cove's Boggy Swamp / B. Cryan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.8; Apr. 1985.
The idea of supernaturalism in Glen Cove is explored, from purely fictional view. Image of the Glen Cove Hotel on Glen Street.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Congregation Tifereth Israel Early in Glen Cove / D. Brooks. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.10; Apr. 1985.
A brief article about one of the earliest Jewish communities having been founded in Glen Cove. It discusses the history of Glen Cove and the impact the Jewish community had on it.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Glen Cove Gets a Telegraph / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.11; Apr. 1985.
A brief article on how Glen Cove came to receive it's first telegraph. It talks about how it was set up between Glen Cove and Hempstead, and Oyster Bay.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Glen Cove: Where Five Proprietors Called Home in 1668 / D. Russell. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.36; Jan. 1983.
The article gives the history of Glen Cove, starting with 1668. The history detail is massive and goes into how Glen Cove became known as the Gold Cost. Important buildings include those on Glen Street, Orient Hotel, Killenworth Estate, Winfield Hall, and the many Victorian homes.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Memories of Glen and School Streets: 1882-1900 / A. Capobianco. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9; Apr. 1985.
A quick article about the history of Glen and School Streets in Glen Cove.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Old Railroad House Doomed to Become a Parking Lot / J. Duffy. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.11; Apr. 1985.
A very quick article about how Glen Cove's old rail road house was converted into a parking-lot. The building had to be destroyed either way, due to it's dilapidated state.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Pratt Estate of Years Gone By Was a City Within a City / A. Capobianco. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9; Apr. 1985.
A brief article about the history of the Pratt Estate and it's involvement in Glen Cove's history.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Oriental Hotel of Glen Cove, L.I. / L. Cuttler. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.36; Jan. 1983.
A subset of "Glen Cove: Where Five Proprietors Called Home in 1668," where the Oriental Hotel is reviewed as a tourist attraction.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dan Daly
Dan Daly: Glen Cove's Two Time Medal of Honor Winner / D. Russell. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9; Apr. 1985.
A quick note about Master Sergeant Daniel Daly, and his hometown of Glen Cove. He won the Medal of Honor twice for his services in the U.S. Marine Corps.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
Spotlight Glen Cove: Heritage of the Future / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.13-15; Apr. 1985.
A collection of photographs of historical buildings in Glen Cove: Corniche Plaza; Grand Café and grand Gourmet; Marina; Gatsby's Landing;
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
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Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Nassau County -- Hempstead

A Historical Sketch of Ancient Agriculture, Stock Breeding, and Manufactures in Hempstead / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 1; p.34-54; Spring 1963.
A detailed record of Hempstead's existence under the Dutch, and what the Dutch demanded from the settlers in the 1600's as payment for land grants. The settlers raised cattle, horses and sheep in addition to farming. They also built roads, milled honey, and expanded their territory to Queens County, Kings County, Great Neck before English settlers began arriving in the latter part of the 1600's.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Early Days in Hempstead / B. Marshall. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 6; p.107-108, 116; Jun. 1943.
A detailed article about the founding of Hempstead and through it's early history. The article includes information about how the town came to be purchased from the Indians, it's own quarrels with the British Crown, and it's role in the Revolutionary War.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Early Years of Hempstead Village / H. DeBeau. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 7; p.123-130; Jul. 1943.
A very detailed article about the founding and subsequent history of Hempstead. The article depicts the town's historic churches, development of commerce, and the role of the town during the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. The author also describes the development of Jurisprudence-prudence that developed and influenced surrounding towns. The article includes images of historic buildings: Searing Homestead, Carriage Factory, Main Street.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
First Train to Greenport, 1844 / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 11; p.203-206, 217; Nov. 1943.
A detailed article about the development of Greenport, especially that of the Long Island Rail Road expansion into Greenport. The article focuses on prominent persons who pushed for the development. The train allowed for better movement between towns, and
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Flushing's Early History / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 10; p.209-210, 212, 214; Oct. 1941.
A detailed article about the founding of Flushing, and it's impact on other local towns. The article details the involvement of Flushing in the Revolutionary War, important figures in Flushing (Long Island) history, with an overview of what made Flushing what it is today.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Glen Cove Gets a Telegraph / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.11; Apr. 1985.
A brief article on how Glen Cove came to receive it's first telegraph. It talks about how it was set up between Glen Cove and Hempstead, and Oyster Bay.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Hempstead and the Indians / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 9; p.167-168; Sep. 1943.
A continuation of "The Birth of Hempstead," in which the author focuses on Hempstead's role with the American Indians. It focuses on how the Dutch and Indians related, heard mutual grievances, and attempted to co-exist in the growing town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Jamaica, New York, 1656-1776: Class Structure and Social Mobility / J. Peyer. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No. 1; p.34-47; Fall 1977.
A overview article about the early days of Jamaica, which includes the development of class structures (both white and black), and the development of class movement. Other towns are referenced as examples of Jamaica's infrastructure, comparison of wealth, and overall development.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Manhasset Highlights / D. Grant. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 5; p.97-98, 100; May. 1941.
A brief article that focuses on the founding of Manhasset, and the Dutch influence from it's founding in 1643 (aprox). It also focuses on the influence the town had on the surrounding areas. It discusses the Dutch Reformed Church, the "White House," and the first school building of the area. Other information includes the town's first newspaper, and other historical information.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 1: 1639-1783) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.53-76; Spring 1967.
A chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1771-1790) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.15-36; Winter 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Birth of Hempstead / A. Faron. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 8; p.153-156, 158; Aug. 1943.
A very detailed article about the development of Hempstead, from it's founding in 1663 to approximately 1800. The article focuses on the Dutch religious influences, the development of the town's government, and the town's role in the Revolutionary War.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 1) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.299-230; Nov. 1940.
A detailed, but brief, article about the founding of Nassau County. It primarily focuses on the politics, governmental issues, and who was involved. The towns mentioned in the article were in relation to county development and home-towns of county leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 2) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 12; p.255-256; Dec. 1940.
A continuation of the article "The Birth of Nassau County," and primarily focuses on the politics and governmental issues. However, the majority of the article focuses on the people who were influential in developing the county.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Inventories of the Estates of Colonel John Youngs of Southold and His Son, John Jr / K. Scott. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p. 37-46; Winter 1966.
An accounting of the estate of Col. John Youngs and John Youngs, Jr. Includes bibliographical information about their travels to various towns across Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Town of Hempstead Archives: 1644-1996, A Wealth of Municipal History / M. Robinson. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 1; p.79-89; Fall 1996.
A detailed article about how the town came to be founded, and how exploring the town's archives has reaffirmed how Hempstead is seen by the rest of Long Island. The article also goes into how diverse and complete the collection is.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Churches
A Tale of Two Churches / H. Horton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 10; p.183, 185-186; Oct. 1943.
A short article about two conflicting churches (Presbyterian and Episcopal) and the founding of Hempstead as a result. This article is about the religious influences on the formation of the town and the town's government. The article also discusses each church's involvement in the Revolutionary War, and their subsequent influence on the town's role in the War. Images included are of the two churches as they stand today, and one's appearance during the 18th century.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Churches
Tale of an Old Church (part 5) / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 8; p.145-146, 150; Aug. 1942.
A continuation of "Tale of an Old Church," focusing on the church's early 19th century history, along with the biographical account of the new parson who lead the church just before the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dutch Reform Church
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dutch Reform Church
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Early Long Island
Life of The Early Islanders (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.45, 46-47, 57-58; Mar. 1943.
A very detailed article about the beginnings of Long Island. The article describes the founding through present day. The second part of the article focuses on the later part of the 1600s through the late 1800s. It also focuses on the governmental and architectural uniqueness of the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Early Schools
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 1) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.105-106, 118; Jun. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of a small school building.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious education of the population of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Fox Hunting
Fox Hunting in America / C. Jones. American Heritage, XXIV-6; p.68-69; Oct. 73.
A detailed account of the beginnings of fox hunting in America. Hempstead is listed as one of the most popular spots to fox hunt since 1768, eventually helping the sport to spread across the rest of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Haviland Mill
Haviland Mill at East Rockaway / L. Elhof. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 1; p.3-4; Jan. 1945.
A detailed but short article about the Haviland Mill, from it's original construction to present day. The article is mostly written in tourist form, detailing the author's experience with the Mill.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Hempstead Harbor Club
Hempstead Harbor Club Has Colorful History / B. Cryan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.7; Apr. 1985.
A quick article of the Hempstead Harbor Club and what it has done to help keep the Hempstead harbor historical.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Hempstead Rail Road
The Woodsfield Disaster on the New York & Hempstead R. R. / V. Seyfried. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.47-51; Winter 1966.
A quick article about how a massive accident on the Hempstead Rail Road with the train to New York City. The article is primarily the testimony of those who witnessed the accident.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Hofstra University
Hofstra First Five Years / D. Gordon. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 9; p.191-192; Sep. 1940.
A brief article about the role of Hofstra Estate and it's first five years in Hempstead as a University. The College was founded in 1935, and received it's first provisional charter in 1937. It was one of the first free and independent colleges on Long Island, and received it's absolute charter in 1939.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Horse Racing
Early Horse Racing on Long Island / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.27, 29-30,37; Feb. 1945.
A short article about the horse racing on Long Island. The article focuses on the people that worked on getting horse racing up and running rather than the direct impact on the towns, especially August Belmont. The article compares Long Island racing to the Lexington and Kentucky racing parks.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Laws
Old Laws of New York / J. Merritt. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.115-116; Jun. 1944.
A short article about the historical laws of New York, with specific mentions of some Long Island towns. It discusses how some laws came into effect, the difference between English and Dutch laws, and how laws changed through out the years.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island University
The Beginning of Long Island University / E. Gatner. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No.1; p.4-33; Fall 1977.
The early years of Long Island University, including the scouting of locations on Long Island, and outside of Brooklyn. Article primarily about the Brooklyn campus, which was the original campus.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Cost Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Population
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Potato Farming
Nassau's Potato Belt / H. Campbell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 7; p.145-146; Jul. 1940.
An article about the impact of potato farming on Long Island. Hicksville was the primary area where potato farming was done, followed by other towns. The article discusses the yield, where potatoes where shipped, and where the potato industry stands as of 1940.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Rock Hall
Rock Hall at Lawrence, 1767 / W. Pettit. Long Island Forum, Vol. 9, No. 1; p.3, 17; Jan. 1946.
A detailed article about the Rock Hall homestead, and built by Josiah Martin in 1767. The house is an important part of Rockaway and Hempstead history as it played a small role in the Revolutionary War. The article also discusses the biographical accounts of the owners.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Slavery
Slavery on Long Island: A Study of Economic Motivation / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.1-12; Spring 1966.
A quick article about the history of slavery on Long Island. Several towns are listed as having been noted in their census for to be slave holding towns. Traditionally, and unlike the south, slaves in Long Island were hose-hold slaves. During the economical changes (early to late 1800s), the slavery was abolished, but slaves were paid next to nothing or nothing at all.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Travels
A Trip Through Long Island in 1744 / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.103-104,117-118; Jun. 1945.
The article is a reproduction from a diary of three passengers who traveled through Long Island. The author of the article does not know who the travelers were, or why they had come to Long Island. They noted each town they stopped in.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Bellmore-Wantagh-Merrick: A South Shore Historical Bonanza / J. Horan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.6-7; Jan. 1982.
This article is the primary history of the three towns focused on in this article. The article goes over the historical importance each town has had on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Clock Making
Hints From L.I. Clock People / P. Barrow. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.8-9; Jan. 1982.
A long and detailed article about clock making on Long Island. It gives a small history of clock making on Long Island, and how clock making has changed. It claims specific towns has having history in the clock making field.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Freeport's Mammoth Marine Industry / C. Jensen. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 5; p.9; Jul. 1938.
A brief article about the history of Freeport harbor, and how it became a town. It also talks about the marine industry that ran from it's founding to present day.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
From 'free port' to Freeport / J. Horan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.43, 45; Mar. 1982.
The history of Freeport and it's rich heritage in oyster farming. At one point, it was a free port for ships before becoming a paying port. But the town that built around the port continued to call itself Freeport.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Story of Freeport / H. Johnson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 12; p.223, 225-227; Dec. 1942.
A very detailed history of Freeport, from it's founding about 1650 to about 1930. Offers information on who founded the town, what buildings were built, and the relationship of Freeport with other towns. The town has an active political history, including a role in the Revolutionary War and the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 07) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 10; p.167-169; Oct. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Jost Stillwell House and Elias Hubbard Ryder House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island University
The Beginning of Long Island University / E. Gatner. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No.1; p.4-33; Fall 1977.
The early years of Long Island University, including the scouting of locations on Long Island, and outside of Brooklyn. Article primarily about the Brooklyn campus, which was the original campus.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Bellmore-Wantagh-Merrick: A South Shore Historical Bonanza / J. Horan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.6-7; Jan. 1982.
This article is the primary history of the three towns focused on in this article. The article goes over the historical importance each town has had on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--State Parks
Know Your State Parks / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1941.
A brief article about the state parks through-out Long Island. Primarily a paragraphical listing with brief notations of what makes each park special or worth seeing.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Bellmore-Wantagh-Merrick: A South Shore Historical Bonanza / J. Horan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.6-7; Jan. 1982.
This article is the primary history of the three towns focused on in this article. The article goes over the historical importance each town has had on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th of April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Bellmore-Wantagh-Merrick: A South Shore Historical Bonanza / J. Horan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.6-7; Jan. 1982.
This article is the primary history of the three towns focused on in this article. The article goes over the historical importance each town has had on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 2) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 12; p.255-256; Dec. 1940.
A continuation of the article "The Birth of Nassau County," and primarily focuses on the politics and governmental issues. However, the majority of the article focuses on the people who were influential in developing the county.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Wantagh Preservation Society Setting Up Museum / J. Horan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.6-7; Jan. 1982.
A side bar to "Bellmore-Wantagh-Merrick," where Wantagh's preservation society is restoring an older building to set up a historical museum for the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Quakers and Abolitionism
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Hurricanes
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.11-14, 102; Aug. 69.
A note about the hurricane damage.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Loading

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Nassau County -- Long Beach

--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Snowstorm
Adrift in the Ice Field / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.209-211; Nov. 1944.
A detailed article about the snowstorm of February 1899 that caused severe damage to Long Island. The article also focuses on various people who were affected, involved with, or had insight on the storm. Images include: Horton's Point Light House, Picture of Ice Damage, and a picture of a sailor.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Loading

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Nassau County -- North Hempstead

Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 2) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 12; p.255-256; Dec. 1940.
A continuation of the article "The Birth of Nassau County," and primarily focuses on the politics and governmental issues. However, the majority of the article focuses on the people who were influential in developing the county.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architects
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--New Quarters
Historical Society Restores New Quarters / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.4; Mar. 1982.
A brief article about the restoration of New Quarters, a 19th century home in North Hempstead. The North Hempstead Historical Society has taken over the project.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Gardening
The Garden Clubs of Long Island / [No author]. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.15, 18; Oct. 1938.
An article about the various garden clubs, and the people that work hard to maintain the land around the various towns. It's also an invitation to joining the clubs.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Merchant Marine Academy
National Academy at Great Neck / P. Kelvington. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 12; p.229-233; Dec. 1945.
A very detailed article about the 1936 establishment of the Merchant Marine Act of 1936 and the marine academy that was established in Great Neck as a result. The article covers the academy's entire history from 1936 to 1945.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part II) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.28-38; Winter 1964.
A continuation of the "Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933" where the author focus the pirates that came after Captain Kidd. These pirates, while minor on a national level, reeked havoc on Long Island they and became famous for their connections with both towns and the wealthy land owners. Captain James Gillam is among the captains listed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Merchant Marine
Masters of the Merchant Marine / R. Uhi. American Heritage, XXXIV-3; p.74-75; Apr. 83.
A detailed account of commercial and merchant marining in the United States. Kings Point is listed as a popular maritime training spot, and was housed on the former Chrysler Estate.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Motor Parkway
Vanderbilt's Motor Parkway / R. Wines. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.14-28; Fall 1962.
The story of the construction of the now abandoned Vanderbilt Parkway. Originally designed for safe and hazard free racing, the Vanderbilt Speedway eventually failed. This is one of the towns where 'public' races were held, allowing motorists to use public roads. Vanderbilt thought this was asking for trouble and attempted to create a private racing road.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
A Long Island Heritage Town: Manhasset / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.5-8; Oct. 1985.
A long article about the history of Manhasset, from the founding of the town to present day. Includes information about various buildings and places that make Manhasset unique. Images included: The Plandome Mill (1693); The Hill and Valley Fire House; Manhasset's original LIRR Station; Trestle Bridge; The Onderdonk House; first Manhasset Public School; Mud House; Shelter Rock.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Manhasset Highlights / D. Grant. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 5; p.97-98, 100; May. 1941.
A brief article that focuses on the founding of Manhasset, and the Dutch influence from it's founding in 1643 (approx). It also focuses on the influence the town had on the surrounding areas. It discusses the Dutch Reformed Church, the "White House," and the first school building of the area. Other information includes the town's first newspaper, and other historical information.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Lives and Identities of the Indians of Shelter Island, 1652-1835 / J. Witek. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.173-184; Spring 1992.
The detailed history of the Native Americans on Long Island, specifically the Montauk Indians of Shelter Island. Article goes over the burial grounds, pottery, and the political points.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Churches
The Congregational Church-43 Years of Service / H. York. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.12; Oct. 1985.
A quick article about a 43 year old church and it's service to Manhasset.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Plandome Manor
Plandome Manor / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9; Oct. 1985.
A quick article about the incorporation of the Village Plandome Manor in Manhasset, and how it came to be part of Long Island History.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Preservation
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island that should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. In Manhasset, the preservation society worked on the Mitchell House, saving it from destruction.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Shelter Rock
The Legend of Shelter Rock / M. Minturn. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9; Oct. 1985.
A very quick article about Shelter Rock, a natural formation in the Hempstead area that was scouted in the mid-17th century.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 2) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 12; p.255-256; Dec. 1940.
A continuation of the article "The Birth of Nassau County," and primarily focuses on the politics and governmental issues. However, the majority of the article focuses on the people who were influential in developing the county.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Clocks
Hints From L.I. Clock People / P. Barrow. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.8-9; Jan. 1982.
A long and detailed article about clock making on Long Island. It gives a small history of clock making on Long Island, and how clock making has changed. It claims specific towns has having history in the clock making field.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Potato Farming
Nassau's Potato Belt / H. Campbell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 7; p.145-146; Jul. 1940.
An article about the impact of potato farming on Long Island. Hicksville was the primary area where potato farming was done, followed by other towns. The article discusses the yield, where potatoes where shipped, and where the potato industry stands as of 1940.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Kelsey House
The Gray Ghost at New Hyde Park / E. Wagner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 7; p. 141-142, 144; Jul. 1940.
A detailed article about The Gray Ghost, which is also known as the Kelsey House. The land was originally settled as the Dougan House in 1685, which lasted until 1926, when the Kelsey House was built. The article notes that the house is in a run-down state and urges that it should be repaired in order to preserve Long Island cultural history.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Potato Farming
Nassau's Potato Belt / H. Campbell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 7; p.145-146; Jul. 1940.
An article about the impact of potato farming on Long Island. Hicksville was the primary area where potato farming was done, followed by other towns. The article discusses the yield, where potatoes where shipped, and where the potato industry stands as of 1940.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--William Cobbett
William Cobbett and Long Island / C. Barrows. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.1-12; Fall 1965.
William Cobbett spent a year in Long Island, living in the Governor Dongan mansion in North Hempstead and some time in New Hyde Park. He even wrote a book, Year's Residence in the United States of America, while managing his loyalist paper Registrar (based in England) and making a meager living in Long Island. The majority of the article is a biographical account of his life in totem, Long Island just being a small fraction.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Beautiful Port Washington a Nice Place to Visit / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.17; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about Port Washington. O'Brien gives some town history, and discusses it's visually pleasing aesthetics.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 2) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 12; p.255-256; Dec. 1940.
A continuation of the article "The Birth of Nassau County," and primarily focuses on the politics and governmental issues. However, the majority of the article focuses on the people who were influential in developing the county.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--1938 Hurricane
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.12, 13; Aug. 69.
A note about the hurricane damage, accompanied by a photograph of Port Washington.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Main Street
Main Street, Port Washington 1914 / M. Haller. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 2; p.17-27; Spring 1965.
An article, semi-biographical, about Main Street, Port Washington. During 1914, there was an influx of people moving into Port Washington, a few of which made lasting impression well into the 1960s.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Quakers and Abolitionism
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dutch
Dutch Were Sturdy Islanders / E. Wagner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 4; p.5-6, 18; Apr. 1939.
A detailed article about the founding of Long Island, through the Dutch perspective. The article also goes into detail about a few specific towns and an anthological perspective on how they lead their lives.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th of April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable) districts.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island that should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. Roslyn is noted for it's preservation society, the Landmark Society, and it's work.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
Nassau's Oldest House, Time Has Passed It By / K. Lonetto. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.11; Oct. 1984.
A history of one of the oldest surviving houses in Long Island, which was built in 1680. It has been restored and now exists in Roslyn, as a museum. Image of: Van Nostrand-Starkins House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Westbury, Mecca of Polo World / G. Preece. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 3; p.11; May. 1938.
A very brief article of about the polo-playing in Westbury, including clubs and private fields. Westbury draws plenty of people of people to play each year.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
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Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Nassau County -- Oyster Bay

A Long Island Heritage Town: Oyster Bay, An Historic Hamlet / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.5-12; May. 1985.
A collection of articles about Oyster Bay. The main article gives details about the town's founding in 1639 to present day. Includes information about T. R. Roosevelt. Images Include: Rail Road Station; Summer White House; The Landing; East Main Street showing Presbyterian Church; Octagon Hotel; Mill Road; West Main Street with Post Office; T. R. Roosevelt on Audrey Ave.; T. R. Roosevelt in Oyster Bay; T. R. Roosevelt at Sagamore Hill; Oyster Bay Inn; Town Clerks Office on Audrey Ave.; Ludlum Homestead; LIRR welcoming T. R. Roosevelt; Greenwich-Oyster bay Ferry; Fullers and T. R. Roosevelt;
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Flushing's Early History / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 10; p.209-210, 212, 214; Oct. 1941.
A detailed article about the founding of Flushing, and it's impact on other local towns. The article details the involvement of Flushing in the Revolutionary War, important figures in Flushing (Long Island) history, with an overview of what made Flushing what it is today.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Glen Cove Gets a Telegraph / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.11; Apr. 1985.
A brief article on how Glen Cove came to receive it's first telegraph. It talks about how it was set up between Glen Cove, Hempstead, and Oyster Bay.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Life of The Early Islanders (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.45, 46-47, 57-58; Mar. 1943.
A very detailed article about the beginnings of Long Island. The article describes the founding through present day. The second part of the article focuses on the later part of the 1600s through the late 1800s. It also focuses on the governmental and architectural uniqueness of the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1644-1770) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.13-38; Fall 1965.
A chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 1) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.299-230; Nov. 1940.
A detailed, but brief, article about the founding of Nassau County. It primarily focuses on the politics, governmental issues, and who was involved. The towns mentioned in the article were in relation to county development and home-towns of county leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 2) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 12; p.255-256; Dec. 1940.
A continuation of the article "The Birth of Nassau County," and primarily focuses on the politics and governmental issues. However, the majority of the article focuses on the people who were influential in developing the county.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Pearl in the Bay-A Visit to the Hamlet / B. Bush. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.33, 36; Mar. 1982.
A long article about the town of Oyster Bay and it's Hamlet. Important buildings include: Raynham Hall , Theodore Roosevelt Elementary School, and Main Street. The article is told from a tourist point of view.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architects
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Culture
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious education of the population of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th of April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Henry Lloyd Estate
The Account Books of Henry Lloyd of the Manor of Queens Village / R. Bailey. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.26-49; Spring 1962.
Primarily an article about Henry Lloyd and Queens Village Manor (an estate connected to the English Court through Governor pensions), how important the records that Lloyd kept are to Genealogy, the history of what is Lloyd's Neck, Long Island. The Manor is located between Huntington and Oyster Bay. See printing of the account books in Vol. 5, No. 3, Summer 1965, pgs. 30-34.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Homes
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Preservation
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. Oyster Bay is noted because of the preservation's society's tireless work in restoring and preserving Raynham Hall (and being involved with the preservation of Sagamore Hill).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--John Youngs
The Inventories of the Estates of Colonel John Youngs of Southold and His Son, John Jr / K. Scott. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p. 37-46; Winter 1966.
An accounting of the estate of Col. John Youngs and John Youngs, Jr. Includes bibliographical information about their travels to various towns across Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
T. R. and the L.I.R.R. / R. Ziel. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; P.10; May. 1985.
A long article about the history of T. R. and his involvement with the Fullers, who founded the Long Island Rail Road. Image of Fuller and the Roosevelt's.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Molly Cooper
Molly Cooper of Cove Neck / J. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 5; p.9-10, 18-19; May. 1939.
The biographical account of Molly Cooper, who made a large impact on Cove Neck and Oyster Bay. She kept a diary during the period (1769-1773) just prior to the Revolutionary War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Motor Parkway
Vanderbilt's Motor Parkway / R. Wines. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.14-28; Fall 1962.
The story of the construction of the now abandoned Vanderbilt Parkway. Originally designed for safe and hazard free racing, the Vanderbilt Speedway eventually Failed. This town attempted to stop the public races after people were killed in the pursuit of the 6th Vanderbilt Cup.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Population
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Presidents
Suffolk County Lured Presidents / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 2; p.7, 20-21; Mar. 1938.
An article about the Presidential influences on Long Island, including T. R. Roosevelt, William Harrison, & Ulysses S. Grant. It also includes some information about First Lady, Anna Symmes.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Quakers
Oyster Bay's Place in the History of Quakerism in America / B. Johnston. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.12; May. 1985.
A long article about the history of Oyster Bay and the Quakers who settled the town. It also gives an explanation of how Quakerism changed to reflect the traditions of Long Island. Images included are the pulpit rock of town's fonder and a reenactment of the revolutionary war.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Quakers and Abolitionism
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Robert Feke
Oyster Bay's Robert Feke: America's First Portraitist / L. Cuttler. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A detailed article about Robert Feke, a Long Island, native from Oyster Bay.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sagamore Hill
Sagamore Hill, Roosevelt's Legacy / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.37; Mar. 1982.
A detailed article about the tourism of Sagamore Hill, it's history, and it's connection to T. Roosevelt.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sagamore Hill
The Ghosts of Sagamore Hill / A. Roosevelt, Jr. American Heritage, XXI-3; p.70-73; Apr. 70.
The biographical account of Theodore Roosevelt's grandson, who was one at the time of the President's death. He states that spending time at the family home, Sagamore Hill, in Oyster Bay is a haunted experience for him. He notes that he feels the "ghost" of the former President is there, through his many possessions and through the work of his aunt, Alice Roosevelt (President Roosevelt's eldest daughter).
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Schools
Early Oyster Bay Schools / H. Horton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.213; Nov. 1944.
A short article about the first few schools in Oyster Bay, as done by the English and Dutch settlers. The article goes into detail about the first school founding in 1677, and the 1802 founding of the Academy. The article also discusses the impact of religious education in public schools.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Teddy Roosevelt
T. R. and the L.I.R.R. / R. Ziel. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; P.10; May. 1985.
A long article about the history of T. R. and his involvement with the Fullers, who founded the Long Island Rail Road. Image of Fuller and the Roosevelt's.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Typhoid Mary
The Case of the Disappearing Cook / M. Sufrin. American Heritage, XXI-5; p.37-39; Aug. 70.
The story of Mary Mallon, who would go down in history as Typhoid Mary. She worked as a cook for several high-class families and each one fell ill shortly after her arrival and taking new positions. It took years to track and imprison her as a danger to public health. She eventually was released and forced to live in seclusion by and at the expense of the State of New York. Oyster Bay is mentioned because she worked for a family that fell ill shortly after her arrival, and triggered an investigation into Mary Mallon's past.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
A Summer's Memory of The Bayville Hotel / I. Kegen. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.15, 25; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about a historical hotel in Bayville, Long Island. Gives the history of the building and a few quick notes about the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Bellmore-Wantagh-Merrick: A South Shore Historical Bonanza / J. Horan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.6-7; Jan. 1982.
This article is the primary history of the three towns focused on in this article. The article goes over the historical importance each town has had on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Bethpage State Park
The Story of Bethpage State Park / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 6; p.109-113; Jun. 1942.
A very detailed article about Bethpage State Park. The article starts with the founding of the town in 1695, and focuses on the key people who created the park directly between Bethpage and Farmingdale. The park wasn't actually conceived until the 1930s. It was originally created as a golf-course before becoming a public park with polo matches, picnic areas, and an 18-hole golf course.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A detailed article about the industrial boom of Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns mentioned are noted as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--National Parks and Reserves
Know Your State Parks / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1941.
A brief article about the state parks through-out Long Island. Primarily a paragraphical listing with brief notations of what makes each park special or worth seeing.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Quakers and Abolitionism
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Modern Times
Stephen Pearl Andrews and Modern Times, Long Island / M. Stern. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 4; p.1-15; Fall 1964.
Modern Times was a small utopian village set up in Brookville Long Island. It eventually failed, due to poor economics and other hardships.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Molly Cooper
Molly Cooper of Cove Neck / J. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 5; p.9-10, 18-19; May. 1939.
The biographical account of Molly Cooper, who made a large impact on Cove Neck and Oyster Bay. She kept a diary during the period (1769-1773) just prior to the Revolutionary War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Silk Dyeing
Silk Dyeing on Long Island / E. DeMott. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 3; p.8; May. 1938.
A brief article about the silk-dying industry that established itself on in Farmingdale. The main company is that of Independent Silk Dying Co., and that of R. A. Weber Silk Dyeing, it's compotator.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
An Island wide Electric Storm / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.113; Jun. 1945.
A quick article about an electrical storm on August 12, 1895 that destroyed large portions of the island and took lives. Specific towns that had considerable damage is discussed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Potato Farming
Nassau's Potato Belt / H. Campbell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 7; p.145-146; Jul. 1940.
An article about the impact of potato farming on Long Island. Hicksville was the primary area where potato farming was done, followed by other towns. The article discusses the yield, where potatoes where shipped, and where the potato industry stands as of 1940.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 2) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 12; p.255-256; Dec. 1940.
A continuation of the article "The Birth of Nassau County," and primarily focuses on the politics and governmental issues. However, the majority of the article focuses on the people who were influential in developing the county.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architects
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Clock Making
Hints From L.I. Clock People / P. Barrow. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.8-9; Jan. 1982.
A long and detailed article about clock making on Long Island. It gives a small history of clock making on Long Island, and how clock making has changed. It claims specific towns has having history in the clock making field.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Electric Storm
An Island wide Electric Storm / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.113; Jun. 1945.
A quick article about an electrical storm on August 12, 1895 that destroyed large portions of the island and took lives. Specific towns that had considerable damage is discussed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Potato Farming
Nassau's Potato Belt / H. Campbell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 7; p.145-146; Jul. 1940.
An article about the impact of potato farming on Long Island. Hicksville was the primary area where potato farming was done, followed by other towns. The article discusses the yield, where potatoes where shipped, and where the potato industry stands as of 1940.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Expressways and Highways
Long Island Motor Parkway: An Innovative Highway Built for High Speeds / K. Navratil. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.53; Oct. 1984.
A detailed notation of the history of the Long Island Expressway, from it's conception to it's modern state. It discusses the Vanderbuilt involvement in building the road, racing on the roadway, and how it became known for it's high-speed usage.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Motor Parkway
Vanderbilt's Motor Parkway / R. Wines. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.14-28; Fall 1962.
The story of the construction of the now abandoned Vanderbilt Parkway. Originally designed for safe and hazard free racing, the Vanderbilt Speedway eventually failed. This is one of the towns where 'public' races where held, allowing motorists to use public roads. Vanderbilt thought this was asking for trouble and attempted to create a private racing road.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Presidents
Suffolk County Lured Presidents / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 2; p.7, 20-21; Mar. 1938.
An article about the Presidential influences on Long Island, including T. R. Roosevelt, William Harrison, & Ulysses S. Grant. It also includes some information about First Lady, Anna Symmes.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Quakers and Abolitionism
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Bellmore-Wantagh-Merrick: A South Shore Historical Bonanza / J. Horan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.6-7; Jan. 1982.
This article is the primary history of the three towns focused on in this article. The article goes over the historical importance each town has had on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--State Parks
Know Your State Parks / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1941.
A brief article about the state parks through-out Long Island. Primarily a paragraphical listing with brief notations of what makes each park special or worth seeing.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Fort Neck
Was There a Battle at Fort Neck? / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 12; p.231, 234-237; Dec. 1942.
An very detailed article about the history of the Fort Neck area. It is the author's contention that the battle surrounding the Fort Neck area is showed in misconception and misrepresentation. The author begins to chronologically trace the battle to clear up misconceptions.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Tyron Hall
Tyron Hall at Massapequa / E. Wagner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.7-8, 20-21; Oct. 1938.
An article about the historic Tyron Hall, in Massapequa. It gives a partial history of Massapequa and the Tyron Hall that has been around since 1696, and remains at least in part.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Quakers and Abolitionism
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Preservation
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island that should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. Old Bethpage's preservation society managed to preserve a 150 acre park, as well as the Powell Farm.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Whaling
Whaling is Different Today / R. Coburn. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 1; p.5, 7-8; Jan. 1945.
A detailed article about whaling life on the various parts on Long Island, and how it has changed over the course of it's history. The primary focus of the article is on the modern view on whaling, and what kind of whales are hunted for off the cost of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Sagamore Hill, Roosevelt's Legacy / [No author]. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.37; Mar. 1982.
A detailed article about the tourism of Sagamore Hill, it's history, and it's connection to T. Roosevelt.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Ghosts of Sagamore Hill / A. Roosevelt, Jr. American Heritage, XXI-3; p.70-73; Apr. 70.
An image of President Theodore Roosevelt at Sagamore Hill.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Alice Roosevelt Longworth
Before Colors Fade: Alice Roosevelt Longworth / J. Bingman. American Heritage, XX-2; p.77-78; Feb. 69.
A mini-biography about Alice "Auntie Sister" Roosevelt Longworth, the eldest daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt. The article shows that she was known for her wit, her intelligence, for breaking the rules when she could. She lived at Sagamore Hill with her father, her step-mother, and half-siblings.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Fox Hunting
Fox Hunting in America / C. Jones. American Heritage, XXIV-6; p.101-102; Oct. 73.
A detailed account of the beginnings of fox hunting in America. There is an image of President Theodore Roosevelt on a horse during a fox hunting outing at his home, Sagamore Hill.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island that should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. Sagamore Hill is listed as priority for the preservation societies because of the connection it has to President Theodore Roosevelt, and other famous people.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Memories of a Sea Cliff Christmas / L. Lippsett. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.3, 33; Dec. 1981.
A brief article of how Sea Cliff changes during Christmas. The town takes historical buildings, such as the town mill, and turns it into Santa's Workshop. The article includes some traditional past-times, such as ice-skating and museums.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
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Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Suffolk County -- Babylon

Babylon, Gateway to the Sunrise / J. Horan. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.11-12; Mar. 1982.
The article is a detailed history of Babylon, from the towns inception in 1683 to present day. Historical buildings, such as the Town House, Methodist Episcopal Church, American house, and Argyle Lake.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 1) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.299-230; Nov. 1940.
A detailed, but brief, article about the founding of Nassau County. It primarily focuses on the politics, governmental issues, and who was involved. The towns mentioned in the article were in relation to county development and home-towns of county leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Birds
The Swan Is On Trial / E. DeMott. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 2; p.4; Mar. 1938.
A brief article about the swans adorning Argyle Lake in Babylon. It also discusses the death of a two year old boy who disappeared while playing with the swans. Swans are seen as dangerous, even if beautiful.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Blythebourne
Blythebourne: A Community That Was Swallowed UP / N. Litchfield. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 3; p.28-39; Summer 1964.
Because of the growth in surrounding towns, such as Brooklyn, Blythebourne eventually became an annexed part of other towns.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midst of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanitary Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.127, 129-130; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends at around 1720. The article goes into detail about the education levels, the religious impact on education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. An image of the Clinton Academy, and a listing of attendance statistics are included.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
An article discussing President George Washington's tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed overnight in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, towns he drove through, and famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Masonry
Suffolk's Earliest Masonry / S. Cooper. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 12; p.277-278; Dec. 1941.
An article about the Masons and their various lodges in Suffolk county. The author of the article was a Mason Master. An image of Hallock's Inn is featured, where the Masons met. The article includes brief accounts by the major Masonic leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Peconic County
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A brief statistical article giving which towns and counties have the largest population. It discusses the debate on creating a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Story of Amityville / H. Horton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 11; p.205-208, 215-216; Nov. 1942.
A detailed history of Amityville, which until 1850, did not have an official name and often was annexed as part of the surrounding towns. The article discusses the founding of the town, and the town's role in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. A large part of the article is dedicated to the modern day efforts in conservation.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midst of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanitary Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Gardening
The Garden Clubs of Long Island / [No author]. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.15, 18; Oct. 1938.
An article about the various Long Island garden clubs, and the people that work hard to maintain the land around the towns. The article itself is an invitation to join the clubs.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
An article discussing President George Washington's tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed overnight in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, the towns he drove through, and famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom of Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns mentioned are noted as having had an impact on the industrial changes of Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about Ferdinand Hassler's mapping of Long Island in the 19th century. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Cost Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as reference points. Images are included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
From Paddock to Park: The Story of Belmont Lake State Park / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 5; p.103-106; May. 1941.
A very detailed article about the town of Belmont and the founding of Belmont Lake Park. The article includes the project history, the key players, and the development of Belmont race track. The article includes several images of historic buildings, such as the Belmont Mansion, the old Episcopal Church and images of the Belmont Lake.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Belmont Park
The Birdmen of Belmont Park / T. Naughton. American Heritage, VII-3; p.4-7, p.89-11; Apr. 56.
Historical account of the 1910 air met at Belmont Park on Long Island. Famous pilots, such as Mr. Arch Hoxsy, and Mr. Claude Grahame-Smith lead the air race for the cash prizes. Theodore Roosevelt was in attendance and was personally flown by Mr. Hoxsy.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Horse Racing
Early Horse Racing on Long Island / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.27, 29-30,37; Feb. 1945.
A short article about the horse racing on Long Island. The article focuses on the people that worked on getting horse racing up and running rather than the direct impact on the towns, especially August Belmont. The article compares Long Island racing to the Lexington and Kentucky racing parks.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--National Parks and Reserves
Know Your State Parks / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1941.
A brief article about the state parks through-out Long Island. Primarily a paragraphical listing with brief notations of what makes each park special or worth seeing.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Silk Dyeing
Silk Dyeing on Long Island / E. DeMott. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 3; p.8; May. 1938.
A brief article about the silk-dying industry that established itself on in Farmingdale. The main company is that of Independent Silk Dying Co., and that of R. A. Weber Silk Dyeing, it's compotator.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Cost Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Parks
Know Your State Parks / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1941.
A brief article about the state parks through-out Long Island. Primarily a paragraphical listing with brief notations of what makes each park special or worth seeing.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Parks
The Stormy History of Fire Island State Park / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 9; p.233-238, 244; Oct. 1941.
A very detailed article about the history of Fire Island's state park, from it's establishment to the date of the article. The article discusses areas of Fire Island, and purchase of property for development. Images include those of the light-house, historic main street, and the Surf Hotel.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Shipwrecks
Fire Island's Historic Shipwreck / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 8; p.185-186; Aug. 1941.
A short article about the shipwreck of the Elizabeth, which claimed the life of acclaimed women's right activist Margaret Fuller. The article details a brief biography and what happened that fateful on the Elizabeth. The article also questions if a monument should be erected.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 1 of 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.9-10, 19; Jan. 1939.
A detailed article that compiles a listing of storm damaged towns, and much like the American Heritage articles, explains the damage done by storms to the Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Breslau's First Thirty Years (part 2) / L. Frevert.. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 12; p.235-236; Dec. 1945.
A detailed article about the founding of Breslau, now known as Lindenhurst, starting with it's founding in 1870. The article details how the area came to be settled, and how the Indians influenced the foundation of various towns. The article goes through the building of the town, it's impact on the surrounding areas and important figures in the town's history. This article continues on that idea, and covers the town's history in more depth.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Breslau's First Thirty Years (part 3) / L. Frevert. Long Island Forum, Vol. 9, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1946.
A detailed article about the founding of Breslau, now known as Lindenhurst, starting with it's founding in 1870. The article details how the area came to be settled, and how the Indians influenced the foundation of various towns. The article goes through the building of the town, it's impact on the surrounding areas and important figures in the town's history. This article continues on that idea, and covers the town's history in more depth.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Breslau
Breslau's First Thirty Years / L. Frevert.. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 11; p.215-216; Nov. 1945.
A detailed article about the founding of Breslau, now known as Lindenhurst, starting with it's founding in 1870. The article details how the area came to be settled, and how the Indians influenced the foundation of various towns. The article goes through the building of the town, it's impact on the surrounding areas and important figures in the town's history.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Breslau
Breslau's First Thirty Years / L. Frevert.. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 11; p.215-216; Nov. 1945.
A detailed article about the founding of Breslau, now known as Lindenhurst, starting with it's founding in 1870. The article details how the area came to be settled, and how the Indians influenced the foundation of various towns. The article goes through the building of the town, it's impact on the surrounding areas and important figures in the town's history.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Breslau
Breslau's First Thirty Years (part 2) / L. Frevert.. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 12; p.235-236; Dec. 1945.
A detailed article about the founding of Breslau, now known as Lindenhurst, starting with it's founding in 1870. The article details how the area came to be settled, and how the Indians influenced the foundation of various towns. The article goes through the building of the town, it's impact on the surrounding areas and important figures in the town's history. This article continues on that idea, and covers the town's history in more depth.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Breslau
Breslau's First Thirty Years (part 3) / L. Frevert. Long Island Forum, Vol. 9, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1946.
A detailed article about the founding of Breslau, now known as Lindenhurst, starting with it's founding in 1870. The article details how the area came to be settled, and how the Indians influenced the foundation of various towns. The article goes through the building of the town, it's impact on the surrounding areas and important figures in the town's history. This article continues on that idea, and covers the town's history in more depth.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Preservation
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island that should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. Lindenhurst's preservation society managed to preserve a 150 acre park, as well as the Powell Farm. Huntington's historical society is noted in this article not only for it's preservation work but for also the preservation programs it started.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Silk Dyeing
Silk Dyeing on Long Island / E. DeMott. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 3; p.8; May. 1938.
A brief article about the silk-dying industry that established itself on in Farmingdale. The main company is that of Independent Silk Dying Co., and that of R. A. Weber Silk Dyeing, it's compotator.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
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Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Suffolk County -- Brookhaven

Middle Island's Old Post Office / T. Baylers. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 11; p.203, 212; Nov. 1945.
A short but detailed article about Middle Island's Old Post Office. The article begins with the post office's conception in 1800, where the post office services were held. and how the mailing costs were collected, The article also depicts some biographical information regarding the first post master. It also includes information about Brookhaven's first post office. Images include a picture of the Middle Island Post Office.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1644-1770) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.13-38; Fall 1965.
A chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1771-1790) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.15-36; Winter 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1791-1827) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.23-41; Spring 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Town Meeting Days in Brookhaven / T. Bayles. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 12; p.225-226; Dec. 1945.
A short article about the meeting house, and town activities during the 1800s in Brookhaven. Town meetings were first held at Richard Smith's home, before moving to other locations. The article also discusses the development of Polls, the building of the meeting house, election processes, and it's relationship to the towns around it.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church History
Church Days During Revolution (Part 3 of SHHC) / G. Borthwick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 8; p.9-10, 18; Aug. 1939.
This article finishes the South Haven Church article by Borthwick in previous editions. This article focuses exclusively on the role that the South Haven Church played in the Revolutionary War, and how it's role impacted surrounding areas.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
South Haven's Historic Church / G. Borthwick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No.6; p.9-10, 21-22; Jun. 1939.
A very detailed article about the history of Brookhaven and the subsequent town of South Haven, and the historic church that lays at the center. The article details the history of the church since it's conception in 1655 to modern day views. It also goes in to detail about how the church influenced Brookhaven and the surrounding areas.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
South Haven's Historic Church (Part 2) / G. Borthwick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 7; p.9-10, 20-21; Jul. 1939.
A more detailed focus on the Brookhaven area and the South Haven Church. The article goes into great detail of how the South Haven Church has influenced the surrounding areas. It is an article that is continued into a third part.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
Tale of an Old Church / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.71-72; Apr. 1942.
A brief article about founding of Setauket and the church at the center of town. The church was used as a town meeting hall and the main meeting center. The article also discusses who founded the church and ran the church.\
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
Tale of an Old Church (part 2) / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 5; P.95-96; May. 1942.
A continuation of "Tale of an Old Church," focusing on the structure itself and Nathaniel Tooker's involvement with the church.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
Tale of an Old Church (part 3) / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 6; p.115-116; Jun. 1942.
A continuation of "Tale of an Old Church," focusing on the structure itself and focuses on the role of the church in the Revolutionary War. Of special note is the battle that was fought on the green in front of the church by Col. Parsons.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
Tale of an Old Church (part 5) / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 8; p.145-146, 150; Aug. 1942.
A continuation of "Tale of an Old Church," focusing on the church's early 19th century history, along with the biographical account of the new parson who lead the church just before the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Historic Coram Church / T. Bayles. Long Island Forum, Vol. 9, No. 1; p.5-6, 15; Jan. 1946.
This article focuses on the town of Brookhaven's First Baptist Church, originally built in the 17th century. The church was a meeting house as well as a church. The church was on public lands until the mid 1800s. Article is written as a research essay, including the examination of newspapers, church records, and other supporting documents.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Culture
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious education of the population of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Diaries
A Trip Through Long Island in 1744 / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.103-104,117-118; Jun. 1945.
The article is a reproduction from a diary of three passengers who traveled through Long Island. The author of the article does not know who the travelers were, or why they had come to Long Island. They noted each town they stopped in.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Early Schools
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.127, 129-130; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Clinton Academy, and a listing of attendance statistics.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Patchogue Congregational Church
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 1) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 6; p.103-106; Jun. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The church was founded in January 1743, and is still in session today. The first part of the article covers the founding of the Church until about 1765.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Patchogue Congregational Church
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 2) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The second part of the article covers from 1765 to about 1791. It also gives more details about the church founding, a history of the church building, and the people who ran it.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Peconic County
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Privateering
Privateering by Long Islanders in the American Revolution / C. Nelson. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.25-34; Fall 1974.
A very short article about how Privateering changed the course of the American revolution when Admiral Lord Howe landed on Long Island. Mostly an overview, focusing on a few key figures, but mentions three important towns where standoffs or confirmations occurred.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Satterly Family
Incidents in the Satterly Family / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1945.
A short companion piece to a previous article about the Satterly House and Mill that was previously published. The article focuses on the house located in Brookhaven, and some information on the family as it moved between it's multiple houses.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 1 of 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.9-10, 19; Jan. 1939.
A detailed article that compiles a listing of storm damaged towns, and much like the American Heritage articles, explains the damage done by storms to the Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Whaling
Whaling is Different Today / R. Coburn. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 1; p.5, 7-8; Jan. 1945.
A detailed article about whaling life on the various parts on Long Island, and how it has changed over the course of it's history. The primary focus of the article is on the modern view on whaling, and what kind of whales are hunted for off the cost of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a brief note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk's South Shore-A Strong Heritage / R. Jennings. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9-11; Feb. 1982.
The article focuses on each town individually and how it relates to Suffolk County. Each town is given it's own history, and points out noted events.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Frank Bannerman
The Great Gun Merchant / J. Perisco. American Heritage, XXV-5; p.89-90; Aug. 74.
A biographical account of the life of Frank Bannerman. He was a gun merchant in New York City, selling arms to international militia groups. He closed his office in NYC and moved to Blue Point, Long Island. His small fortress of a home and business eventually became Bannerman's Military Museum.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Privateering
Privateering by Long Islanders in the American Revolution / C. Nelson. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.25-34; Fall 1974.
A very short article about how Privateering changed the course of the American revolution when Admiral Lord Howe landed on Long Island. Mostly an overview, focusing on a few key figures, but mentions three important towns where standoffs or confirmations occurred.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Hurricanes
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-6; p.102-103; Aug. 69.
A detailed account of the 1938 Hurricane that devastated Long Island. Cherry Grove has a brief notation, stating that a wave picked up a cottage on Herman Schoenfeld and moved it 200 yard with out destroying.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Hurricanes
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.102-103; Aug. 69.
A quick note that during the 1938 hurricane hit, a cow was found in a small thicket on Coney Island Shore, having been picked up by the storm and carried there.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Cost Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Parks
Know Your State Parks / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1941.
A brief article about the state parks through-out Long Island. Primarily a paragraphical listing with brief notations of what makes each park special or worth seeing.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Parks
The Stormy History of Fire Island State Park / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 9; p.233-238, 244; Oct. 1941.
A very detailed article about the history of Fire Island's state park, from it's establishment to the date of the article. The article discusses areas of Fire Island, and purchase of property for development. Images include those of the light-house, historic main street, and the Surf Hotel.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Shipwrecks
Fire Island's Historic Shipwreck / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 8; p.185-186; Aug. 1941.
A short article about the shipwreck of the Elizabeth, which claimed the life of acclaimed women's right activist Margaret Fuller. The article details a brief biography and what happened that fateful on the Elizabeth. The article also questions if a monument should be erected.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 1 of 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.9-10, 19; Jan. 1939.
A detailed article that compiles a listing of storm damaged towns, and much like the American Heritage articles, explains the damage done by storms to the Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Motor Parkway
Vanderbilt's Motor Parkway / R. Wines. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.14-28; Fall 1962.
The story of the construction of the now abandoned Vanderbilt Parkway. Originally designed for safe and hazard free racing, the Vanderbilt Speedway eventually failed. This was the original destination from the Queens start of the private raceway. However, the original road was only 9 miles in length, and sat between the two parts of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--1938 Hurricane
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.102-103; Aug. 69.
A note about a man who had two artificial legs. Both legs were swept up in the storm, and later found in perfect condition side by side.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Masatuck
Old Mastic House / C. Nichols. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 4; p.69-70, 78, 80; Apr. 1940.
A very detailed article about the history of Old Mastic and the Manor there, known as Old Mastic House. It also details the Floyd family, that settled the area and built the Old Mastic House. It includes information about slavery on Long Island, and the role of the house in the Revolutionary war. The house is documented as having been in the Floyd family until 1830. The article ends at this point.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Postal Service
Middle Island's Old Post Office / T. Baylers. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 11; p.203, 212; Nov. 1945.
A short but detailed article about Middle Island's Old Post Office. The article begins with the post office's conception in 1800, where the post office services were held, and how the mailing costs were collected. The article also depicts some biographical information regarding the first post master. It also includes information about Brookhaven's first post office. Images include a picture of the Middle Island Post Office.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Churches
Middle Island's First Church / T. Bayles. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 10; p.189-190; Oct. 1945.
A short article about the first church in Middletown (also known as Middle Island). The article goes into a very detailed history of the church, including it's construction, expansions, political aspects, and it's activity until 1941.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--George Fox
Two Tales of Yesteryear / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 10; p.191; Oct. 1945.
A short article about the visit of George Fox, a Quaker, and his opinion of the town.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Homes
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
Church Days During Revolution (Part 3 of SHHC) / G. Borthwick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 8; p.9-10, 18; Aug. 1939.
This article finishes the South Haven Church article by Borthwick in previous editions. This article focuses exclusively on the role that the South Haven Church played in the Revolutionary War, and how it's role impacted surrounding areas.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
An Island wide Electric Storm / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.113; Jun. 1945.
A quick article about an electrical storm on August 12, 1895 that destroyed large portions of the island and took lives. Specific towns that had considerable damage is discussed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 1 of 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.9-10, 19; Jan. 1939.
A detailed article that compiles a listing of storm damaged towns, and much like the American Heritage articles, explains the damage done by storms to the Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Hurricanes
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.102-103; Aug. 69.
A quick note about the damage caused by the 1938 hurricane.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
Little Portion Monastery / J. Jenkins. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.233-234, 236; Nov. 1940.
A short article about a small the history of a Episcopal Perish in the Vicinity of Mt. Sinai. The article goes into detail about the people who created the church, when it became a monastery advocating the poor, and it's current relation to the surrounding communities.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk's South Shore-A Strong Heritage / R. Jennings. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9-11; Feb. 1982.
The article focuses on each town individually and how it relates to Suffolk County. Each town is given it's own history, and points out noted events.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--1938 Hurricane
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.12, 13; Aug. 69.
A note about the hurricane damage.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Architects
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Electric Storm
An Island wide Electric Storm / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.113; Jun. 1945.
A quick article about an electrical storm on August 12, 1895 that destroyed large portions of the island and took lives. Specific towns that had considerable damage is discussed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th of April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Orville B. Ackerly
Orville B. Ackerly Knew Suffolk / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 4; p.5-6, 14, 24; Jun. 1938.
A very detailed biographical article about Orville B. Ackerly, and his association with Suffolk County. Focus on the article is biographical.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Patchogue Congregational Church
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 1) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 6; p.103-106; Jun. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The church was founded in January 1743, and is still in session today. The first part of the article covers the founding of the Church until about 1765.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Patchogue Congregational Church
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 2) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The second part of the article covers from 1765 to about 1791. It also gives more details about the church founding, a history of the church building, and the people who ran it.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Patchogue Congregational Church
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 3) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 8; p.149, 152, 157; Aug. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The third part of the article covers from 1795 to about 1830. The majority of the article focuses on a 1815 letter written by Isaac Overton and a listing of money paid by members to the Church.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Patchogue Congregational Church
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 4) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 9; p.171-174; Sep. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The fourth part of the article starts about 1820 and continues until 1848. The article focuses on the building of a second church, the church's relationship with other denominations, and annual meeting records.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Patchogue Congregational Church
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 5) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 10; p.189-191; Oct. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The fifth part of the article starts about 1850 and ends approximately in 1862. The article primarily contains a listing of contributions made by the Ladies Society, contributions by the Trustees, and member contributions. It also discusses the church's expansion into Sayville.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Patchogue Congregational Church
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 6) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 11; p.213-214; Nov. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The sixth and final installment of the Patchogue articles, and it primarily focuses on a third building of the church, and the costs of fulfilling it's social obligations.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--South Haven Church
Church Days During Revolution (Part 3 of SHHC) / G. Borthwick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 8; p.9-10, 18; Aug. 1939.
This article finishes the South Haven Church article by Borthwick in previous editions. This article focuses exclusively on the role that the South Haven Church played in the Revolutionary War, and how it's role impacted surrounding areas.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Modern Times
Stephen Pearl Andrews and Modern Times, Long Island / M. Stern. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 4; p.1-15; Fall 1964.
Modern Times was a small utopian village set up in Brookville Long Island. It eventually failed, due to poor economics and other hardships.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Southampton's Strange Shipyard / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 12; p.227-228; Dec. 1945.
A short article about the building of two ships in the streets of Southampton. The ships were overly large and were linked to black market trading after disembarking from Long Island. One of the influential people in the creation of these boats is William French. They traveled around Long Island before leaving for Spain.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Harbor Village Grows, 'The tranquil Years' (Part 3) / J. Hilovsky. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.34, 36-37; Aug. 1984.
The history of Port Jefferson after World War 1, gives some details about the town today (as of 1984). Goes into some political aspects of the town, which became of growing importance after the War. Images of: P.T. Barnum's home; Mather House; Bath House; and Bridgeport Harbor.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Architecture
PJ's Architectural Styles Reflect Early Personalities of this Quaint Port Village / K. Navratil. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.38-39; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about the architectural styles. Primarily the article focuses on homes, historical buildings, and public places. It is almost a street by street breakdown of the historical societies' desperate bid to save the town's heritage. Images without notations are included.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industry Comes to PJ and the Little Village Holds on and Grows (Part 2: This History of Port Jefferson) / J. Hilovsky. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.40-41; Jul. 1984.
A detailed article about the town of Port Jefferson. It is a continuation of a previous article, and gives a detailed history of the industrialization of Port Jefferson.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Lexington
The Steamship Lexington, a Legend of LI Sound Sits in Water Grave off PJ / G. Cortelyou. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.42, 44; Jul. 1984.
An article about Lexington, a steamship from 1840, was discovered on the sea-floor in Port Jefferson. The ship is in bad shape and the writer proposes that it be rescued.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Masonry
Suffolk's Earliest Masonry / S. Cooper. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 12; p.277-278; Dec. 1941.
An article about the Masons and their various lodges in Suffolk county. The author of the article was a Mason Master. An image of Hallock's Inn is featured, where the Mason's met. Article includes brief accounts of the major Masonic leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Monastery
Little Portion Monastery / J. Jenkins. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.233-234, 236; Nov. 1940.
A short article about a small the history of a Episcopal Perish in the Vicinity of Mt. Sinai. The article goes into detail about the people who created the church, when it became a monastery advocating the poor, and it's current relation to the surrounding communities.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Port Jefferson House
The Life and Times of Port Jefferson's Oldest House / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.3; Jan. 1982.
The oldest house in Port Jefferson, and how it was moved from it's building location to it's current location. The house was built in 1681, and moved the first time in 1750 and moved again in the early 1900s. This article was to do a quick photographic documentation of the house before it's 1982 move to it's current location.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
Adrift in the Ice Field / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.209-211; Nov. 1944.
A detailed article about the snowstorm of February 1899 that caused severe damage to Long Island. The article also focuses on various people who were affected, involved with, or had insight on the storm. Images include: Horton's Point Light House, Picture of Ice Damage, and a picture of a sailor.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Environment vs. Development: Groundwater and Land Use Planning in Nassau and Suffolk Counties / L. Koppelman. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.16-24; Fall 1997.
The article primarily focuses on Queens and Brooklyn and how proper planning and land use since World War II, while pointing out key planners in each county. The article covers land use decision between the counties since 1930 to 1987.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Expressways and Highways
Long Island Motor Parkway: An Innovative Highway Built for High Speeds / K. Navratil. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.53; Oct. 1984.
A detailed notation of the history of the Long Island Expressway, from it's conception to it's modern state. It discusses the Vanderbuilt involvement in building the road, racing on the roadway, and how it became known for it's high-speed usage.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Fullertons and the Experimental Farms of the Long Island Railroad / C. Chorzempa. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.245-253; Spring 1994.
Primarily about the rise of the Fullerton family and their ownership of the Long Island Rail Road. Certain towns noted for the demand by the public for train access to Manhattan or Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Battle of Setauket Green / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.239; Nov. 1940.
A brief article about the history of Caroline Church and it's role in the history of the town. It also played a part in the Revolutionary War when Col. Hewlett used it as a fort. The church currently stands in it's 1812 Presbyterian construction.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
St. James-Setauket-Stony Brook: A North Shore Oasis of History / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.27-28; Jan. 1982.
A long article about the history of the towns listed, as well as information regarding the Witch Trials that plagued the area. The article also details tourism and industrial life for the area.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
Tale of an Old Church / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.71-72; Apr. 1942.
A brief article about founding of Setauket and the church at the center of town. The church was used as a town meeting hall and the main meeting center. The article also discusses who founded the church and ran the church.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
The Historic Coram Church / T. Bayles. Long Island Forum, Vol. 9, No. 1; p.5-6, 15; Jan. 1946.
This article focuses on the town of Brookhaven's First Baptist Church, originally built in the 17th century. The church was a meeting house as well as a church. The church was on public lands until the mid 1800s. Article is written as a research essay, including the examination of newspapers, church records, and other supporting documents.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 1) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 6; p.103-106; Jun. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The church was founded in January 1743, and is still in session today. The first part of the article covers the founding of the Church until about 1765.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 2) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The second part of the article covers from 1765 to about 1791. It also gives more details about the church founding, a history of the church building, and the people who ran it.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 1) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.105-106, 118; Jun. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of a small school building.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
Old Deeds for An Old House / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 11; p.213-214; Nov. 1945.
A short article about the history of a pre-revolutionary house known as "Old Parsonage," where a member of George Washington's secret service once owned the residence. The article is an archival review of the deeds of the house as it passed from one owner to the next.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
Tales of an Old House / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 9; p.187-188; Sep. 1944.
A personal article about the history of the Satterly Homestead in Setauket. Written by the granddaughter of the home's original owner.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
The Old House on the Hill / J. Smith. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 12; p.225, 236; Dec. 1944.
An article about the Timothy Smith House, originally built around the 1770's. The article goes into detail about the history of the house, about the person who built the house (Major Isaac Smith), and the house's location today.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Satterly Family
Incidents in the Satterly Family / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1945.
A short companion piece to a previous article about the Satterly House and Mill that was previously published. The article focuses on the house located in Brookhaven, and some information on the family as it moved between it's multiple houses.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Seatalcot
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1644-1770) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.13-38; Fall 1965.
A chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
Church Days During Revolution (Part 3 of SHHC) / G. Borthwick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 8; p.9-10, 18; Aug. 1939.
This article finishes the South Haven Church article by Borthwick in previous editions. This article focuses exclusively on the role that the South Haven Church played in the Revolutionary War, and how it's role impacted surrounding areas.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
South Haven's Historic Church / G. Borthwick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No.6; p.9-10, 21-22; Jun. 1939.
A very detailed article about the history of Brookhaven and the subsequent town of South Haven, and the historic church that lays at the center. The article details the history of the church since it's conception in 1655 to modern day views. It also goes in to detail about how the church influenced Brookhaven and the surrounding areas.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
South Haven's Historic Church (Part 2) / G. Borthwick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 7; p.9-10, 20-21; Jul. 1939.
A more detailed focus on the Brookhaven area and the South Haven Church. The article goes into great detail of how the South Haven Church has influenced the surrounding areas. It is an article that is continued into a third part.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 1) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 6; p.103-106; Jun. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The church was founded in January 1743, and is still in session today. The first part of the article covers the founding of the Church until about 1765.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
A Forgotten Christmas / E. Lapham. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.3, 5-6; Jan. 1944.
A short article about Stony Brook's Christmas organization and is primarily about Mark Longanbury and Sarah Young and about how they came to become friends. Their relationship impacted the town in many ways. The article includes images of: The Quaint Old Anderson Store, and The Old Dock House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
St. James-Setauket-Stony Brook: A North Shore Oasis of History / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.27-28; Jan. 1982.
A long article about the history of the towns listed, as well as information regarding the Witch Trials that plagued the area. The article also details tourism and industrial life for the area.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Tales of Old Stony Brook / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.29; Feb. 1941.
A brief article about the town of Old Stony Brook, from a historical perspective. It primarily discusses traveling between Stony Brook and New York City, and some biographical information regarding key figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
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Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Suffolk County -- East Hampton

East Hampton's Guild Hall / D. Quick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 6; p.119-120; Jun. 1940.
A summer account of East Hampton and Riverhead, and the Guild Hall. The author takes a personal view of East Hampton, and discusses the Payne House, and the 1931 opening of the Guild Hall in East Hampton in architectural detail. The article does not go into historical detail or town history, but is a personal account of the author.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Life of The Early Islanders (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.45, 46-47, 57-58; Mar. 1943.
A very detailed article about the beginnings of Long Island. The article describes the founding through present day. The second part of the article focuses on the later part of the 1600s through the late 1800s. It also focuses on the governmental and architectural uniqueness of the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1644-1770) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.13-38; Fall 1965.
A chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1771-1790) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.15-36; Winter 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1791-1827) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.23-41; Spring 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Village of East Hampton,' A Sketch by John Howard Payne, Edited with an Introduction and Notes / R. Rushmore. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.25-38; Fall 1997.
A reprint of John Howard Payne's short essay on East Hampton, that focuses on the traditions on the towns. He describes the town's history as he sees it, and where the town is going. Payne's article was originally written in the early 1800s.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
Tale of an Old Church (part 3) / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 6; p.115-116; Jun. 1942.
A continuation of "Tale of an Old Church," focusing on the structure itself and focuses on the role of the church in the Revolutionary War. Of special note is the battle that was fought on the green in front of the church by Col. Parsons.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
The Shinnecock Church / A. Hulsey. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 7; p.129-132; Jul. 1945.
A short article about the Native Long Island Indians and the first and oldest Protestant Church that they belonged to. The article discusses the political and the religious aspects of the conversation from Native American ideals with the early European settlers of Long Island. The article discusses the first school master and the first reverend who converted them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Clinton Academy
The Clinton Academy 200 Years at the Heart of East Hampton Village / J. Graybeal. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.62-63; Jul. 1984.
A detailed article about the history of Clinton Academy, and slightly about the history of East Hampton. The academy was founded in 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 1) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.105-106, 118; Jun. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of a small school building.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.127, 129-130; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Clinton Academy, and a listing of attendance statistics.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 3) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.153-155; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Huntington Academy dated in 1825.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Farmer-Fishermen
Try Pots and Fish Factories / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.23-24, 37; Feb. 1946.
An article about the 19th century farmer-fishermen of Suffolk County and their impact on the economic status of Long Island. The article goes into goes into detail about fish factories, the work environment, and the people involved. The article runs from the 1700s to the late 1800s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
Bibles and Muskets: The Acculturation of East End Native Americans in the Eighteenth Century / J. Witek. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.208-222; Spring 1994.
A very brief article about the English settlers of Long Island and the reformation and reprogramming of various Indian tribes, including the Montauk Indians, for whom a town is named.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Lives and Identities of the Indians of Shelter Island, 1652-1835 / J. Witek. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.173-184; Spring 1992.
The detailed history of the Native Americans on Long Island, specifically the Montauk Indians of Shelter Island. Article goes over the burial grounds, pottery, and the political points.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road, A Most Unique Early History / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.26, 45; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road. It gives details similar to previous articles about the Long Island Railed Road, but builds on the idea of it being a Unique part of Long Island History.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Cost Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
The Case for Peconic County / F. Thiele Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.145-151; Spring 1997.
An article in support of the creation of Peconic County, a new county at the Eastern most tip of Long Island. There are several towns that would be included in this.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part 1) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.40-49; Spring 1963.
A short article about the pirates that ran the waters between Long Island and other parts of the world. The most famous pirate noted is Captain Kidd, whom was friends with the wealthiest family on the island, the Gardiners. He traveled to several towns in Long Island, picking up or dropping off his treasures as he chose.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Presidents
Suffolk County Lured Presidents / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 2; p.7, 20-21; Mar. 1938.
An article about the Presidential influences on Long Island, including T. R. Roosevelt, William Harrison, & Ulysses S. Grant. It also includes some information about First Lady, Anna Symmes.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 3; p.11-12; Mar. 1939.
A continuation of a previous article, and starts in the early 1800's, where Part 2 left off (Note: Part 2 is not in our records). The article goes into detail about some of the blizzards and harsh storms on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Whaling
Long Island Whaling / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 9; p.207-208, 211-212, 215-216; Sep. 1941.
A brief article about the maritime pursuits on Long Island, including whaling. It discusses a few towns that had an impact on the whaling business, and the regulations they helped to establish, and their competitive nature with surrounding maritime states.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Whaling
Whaling is Different Today / R. Coburn. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 1; p.5, 7-8; Jan. 1945.
A detailed article about whaling life on the various parts on Long Island, and how it has changed over the course of it's history. The primary focus of the article is on the modern view on whaling, and what kind of whales are hunted for off the cost of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Windmills
The Windmills of Long Island / E. Robinson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 1; p.5-10; Jan. 1940.
A short and detailed article about the location and history of the windmills of Long Island. It discusses the role windmills played over the years in the shaping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a brief summary about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
A Trip Through Long Island in 1744 / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.103-104,117-118; Jun. 1945.
The article is a reproduction from a diary of three passengers who traveled through Long Island. The author of the article does not know who the travelers were, or why they had come to Long Island. They noted each town they stopped in.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Historic Gardiner's Island / R. McCollom. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 3; p.9-10, 16; Mar. 1939.
An article about the history of Gardiner's Island, from it's founding to present day. It includes information about the founder Lion Gardiner and the house he built there when he founded it. Includes an image of the updated Manor House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Old Fort at Gardiner's Island / H. Horton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 10; p.197; Oct. 1944.
A short article about the history the Fort Tyler Military Reservation on Gardiner's Island. The article is primarily a reconstruction of letters of Mary Bell, and her views on the 'Old Fort." The article also discusses Fort Wright on Plum Island, and Fort Terry on Fisher's Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1771-1790) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.15-36; Winter 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part 1) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.40-49; Spring 1963.
A short article about the pirates that ran the waters between Long Island and other parts of the world. The most famous pirate noted is Captain Kidd, whom was friends with the wealthiest family on the island, the Gardiners. He traveled to several towns in Long Island, picking up or dropping off his treasures as he chose.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
Adrift in the Ice Field / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.209-211; Nov. 1944.
A detailed article about the snowstorm of February 1899 that caused severe damage to Long Island. The article also focuses on various people who were affected, involved with, or had insight on the storm. Images include: Horton's Point Light House, Picture of Ice Damage, and a picture of a sailor.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Windmills
The Windmills of Long Island / E. Robinson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 1; p.5-10; Jan. 1940.
A short and detailed article about the location and history of the windmills of Long Island. It discusses the role windmills played over the years in the shaping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Manhasset Highlights / D. Grant. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 5; p.97-98, 100; May. 1941.
A brief article that focuses on the founding of Manhasset, and the Dutch influence from it's founding in 1643 (aprox). It also focuses on the influence the town had on the surrounding areas. It discusses the Dutch Reformed Church, the "White House," and the first school building of the area. Other information includes the town's first newspaper, and other historical information.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious education of the population of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Journals
Long Islandiana / LIHS. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 1; p.48-57; Winter 1965.
An addendum to most of the Long Island History journals, which mostly is commentary. However, this article contains notes about the deed for Montauk and the Hamptons as the were sold from the Indians to European settlers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic Bay
Bunker Fishing in Peconic Bay / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 10; p.183, 197-198; Oct. 1945.
A detailed article about fishing on Peconic Bay in Hempstead. The article primarily discusses the use of Bunkers, a fishing net that separates water into segments. The article discusses the formation of fishing companionless, and the development of fishing standards.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part II) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.28-38; Winter 1964.
A continuation of the "Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933" where the author focus the pirates that came after Captain Kidd. These pirates, while minor on a national level, reeked havoc on Long Island they and became famous for their connections with both towns and the wealthy land owners. Captain James Gillam is among the captains listed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Breslau's First Thirty Years / L. Frevert.. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 11; p.215-216; Nov. 1945.
A detailed article about the founding of Breslau, now known as Lindenhurst, starting with it's founding in 1870. The article details how the area came to be settled, and how the Indians influenced the foundation of various towns. The article goes through the building of the town, it's impact on the surrounding areas and important figures in the town's history.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Formation of Montauk Point / R. Torrey. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 9; p.227-228; Oct. 1941.
A brief article about the formation of Montauk Point, including a brief town history, and the surrounding beaches.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Jeannette Rattray Writes Again / [No author]. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 4; p.26; Jun. 1938.
A very brief article about the historical value of Montauk. It gives some information about the town's founding, including some information about Captain Kidd's visit to the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Long Islandiana / LIHS. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 1; p.48-57; Winter 1965.
An addendum to most of the Long Island History journals, which mostly is commentary. However, this article contains notes about the deed for Montauk and the Hamptons as the were sold from the Indians to European settlers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Acculturation
Bibles and Muskets: The Acculturation of East End Native Americans in the Eighteenth Century / J. Witek. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.208-222; Spring 1994.
A very brief article about the English settlers of Long Island and the reformation and reprogramming of various Indian tribes, including the Montauk Indians, for whom a town is named.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 3) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.153-155; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Huntington Academy dated in 1825.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Preservation
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island that should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. Walt Whitman's house and a light-house in Montauk.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Long Island Historical Journal, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road, A Most Unique Early History / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.26, 45; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road. It gives details similar to previous articles about the Long Island Railed Road, but builds on the idea of it being a unique part of Long Island History.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Orville B. Ackerly
Orville B. Ackerly Knew Suffolk / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 4; p.5-6, 14, 24; Jun. 1938.
A very detailed biographical article about Orville B. Ackerly, and his association with Suffolk County. Focus on the article is biographical.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Peconic County
The Case for Peconic County / F. Thiele Jr. Long Island Historical Journal, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.145-151; Spring 1997.
An article in support of the creation of Peconic County, a new county at the Eastern most tip of Long Island. There are several towns that would be included in this.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part 1) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.40-49; Spring 1963.
A short article about the pirates that ran the waters between Long Island and other parts of the world. The most famous pirate noted is Captain Kidd, who was friends with the wealthiest family on the island, the Gardiners. He traveled to several towns in Long Island, picking up or dropping off his treasures as he chose.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part II) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.28-38; Winter 1964.
A continuation of the "Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933" where the author focus the pirates that came after Captain Kidd. These pirates, while minor on a national level, reeked havoc on Long Island they and became famous for their connections with both towns and the wealthy land owners. Captain James Gillam is among the captains listed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Population
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sagtikos Manor
Sagtikos Manor / G. Tooker. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 3; p.53-54, 56, 60; Mar. 1940.
A very detailed article about the historic Sagtikos Manor, which was built around 1697. The Manor played some part in the Revolutionary War. The family still owns the estate, though not through direct heirs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Shinnecock
The Shinnecock Church / A. Hulsey. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 7; p.129-132; Jul. 1945.
A short article about the Native Long Island Indians and the first and oldest Protestant Church that they belonged to. The article discusses the political and the religious aspects of the conversation from Native American ideals with the early European settlers of Long Island. The article discusses the first school master and the first reverend who converted them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--State Parks
Know Your State Parks / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1941.
A brief article about the state parks through-out Long Island. Primarily a paragraphical listing with brief notations of what makes each park special or worth seeing.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Storms
Adrift in the Ice Field / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.209-211; Nov. 1944.
A detailed article about the snowstorm of February 1899 that caused severe damage to Long Island. The article also focuses on various people who were affected, involved with, or had insight on the storm. Images include: Horton's Point Light House, Picture of Ice Damage, and a picture of a sailor.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Whaling
Long Island Whaling / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 9; p.207-208, 211-212, 215-216; Sep. 1941.
A brief article about the maritime pursuits on Long Island, including whaling. It discusses a few towns that had an impact on the whaling business, and the regulations they helped to establish, and their competitive nature with surrounding maritime states.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Windmills
The Windmills of Long Island / E. Robinson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 1; p.5-10; Jan. 1940.
A short and detailed article about the location and history of the windmills of Long Island. It discusses the role windmills played over the years in the shaping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Long Island's Ghost Town / H. Tumey. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 6; p.113-115; Jun. 1943.
A short article about the lost town of Northwest, which lies directly east of Sag Harbor. The town no longer exists as a town, but has been built over by surrounding areas. The article goes into the founding of the town, it's key leaders, and what happened to caused the town to become a Ghost Town. It also discusses the aspects of the town, such as farming and whaling, that allowed for the town to be prosperous for some time.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
A Trip Through Long Island in 1744 / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.103-104,117-118; Jun. 1945.
The article is a reproduction from a diary of three passengers who traveled through Long Island. The author of the article does not know who the travelers were, or why they had come to Long Island. They noted each town they stopped in.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Greenport 100 Years Old / M. Hartley. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.12; Oct. 1938.
A brief article celebrating the 100 years since Greenport's founding. It discusses the harbor, the founding in 1838, and the modern view of Greenport.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Life of The Early Islanders (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.45, 46-47, 57-58; Mar. 1943.
A very detailed article about the beginnings of Long Island. The article describes the founding through present day. The second part of the article focuses on the later part of the 1600s through the late 1800s. It also focuses on the governmental and architectural uniqueness of the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Meigs' Raid on Sag Harbor / H. Horton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 7; p.155-156; Jul. 1941.
A short article about the Jonathan Meigs raid on Sag Harbor on April 25th, 1777. While it's a small note in the Revolutionary War, it's a large part of the history of Sag Harbor and Long Island. An image of Brick Kiln Road and a small brick building that served as the British hospital during the raid.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Sag Harbor, Island Cinderella / H. Weeks. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.7-8, 15-16 (and insert); Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about the architecture of Sag Harbor, especially the churches that are found all over town. The Dutch influence is easy to find, as well as the Whaling influence, is found throughout the architecture. Most of the buildings exist from the early 18th and 19th centuries, and were forged by hand. The article includes images of: The Whaling Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Herald House, Sag Harbor / N. Willey. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 5; p.95-96; May. 1940.
The article gives a short account of the history of the Harold House in Sag Harbor. The article is primarily on the details of the house itself, not it's role in history, through that information is present. The house is now a museum.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
Whalers Church to be Restored / H. Weeks. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.217; Nov. 1944.
A short article about the restoration efforts of Whaler's Church in Sag Harbor. The entire focus of the article is on the restoration effort, and does not discuss any history of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part 1) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.40-49; Spring 1963.
A short article about the pirates that ran the waters between Long Island and other parts of the world. The most famous pirate noted is Captain Kidd, whom was friends with the wealthiest family on the island, the Gardiners. He traveled to several towns in Long Island, picking up or dropping off his treasures as he chose.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part II) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.28-38; Winter 1964.
A continuation of the "Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933" where the author focus the pirates that came after Captain Kidd. These pirates, while minor on a national level, reeked havoc on Long Island they and became famous for their connections with both towns and the wealthy land owners. Captain James Gillam is among the captains listed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sailing Ships
Southampton's Strange Shipyard / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 12; p.227-228; Dec. 1945.
A short article about the building of two ships in the streets of Southampton. The ships were overly large and were linked to black market trading after disembarking from Long Island. One of the influential people in the creation of these boats is William French. They traveled around Long Island before leaving for Spain.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
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Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Suffolk County -- Huntington

Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Heart of Early Huntington / R. Sammis. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 8; p.151-152; Aug. 1942.
A detailed article about the history of the town of Huntington, and building of roadways in the town. It also focuses on the agricultural aspect of the town, which sat at the town's center.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
History of Huntington / R. Sammis. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.26; Jan. 1938.
An article written by the official historian of Huntington. Gives little data on the founding of the town, or it's history. The article is just an overview and an invitation to join the Historical Society.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Huntington: An Intriguing Township Full of Preserved History and Caring Historians / M. Bessell. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.10-17; Mar. 1984.
The detailed history of the founding of Huntington, from the town's inception in 1653 to present day. It goes into detail about important figures who shaped the town, and the town's relationship with the surrounding areas.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1644-1770) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.13-38; Fall 1965.
A chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1771-1790) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.15-36; Winter 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1791-1827) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.23-41; Spring 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Account Books of Henry Lloyd of the Manor of Queens Village / R. Bailey. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.26-49; Spring 1962.
Primarily an article about Henry Lloyd and Queens Village Manor (an estate connected to the English Court through Governor pensions), how important the records that Lloyd kept are to Genealogy the history of what is Lloyd's Neck, Long Island. The Manor is located between Huntington and Oyster Bay. See printing of the account books in Vol. 5, No. 3, Summper 1965, pgs. 30-34.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 1) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.299-230; Nov. 1940.
A detailed, but brief, article about the founding of Nassau County. It primarily focuses on the politics, governmental issues, and who was involved. The towns mentioned in the article were in relation to county development and home-towns of county leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Breslau
Breslau's First Thirty Years / L. Frevert.. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 11; p.215-216; Nov. 1945.
A detailed article about the founding of Breslau, now known as Lindenhurst, starting with it's founding in 1870. The article details how the area came to be settled, and how the Indians influenced the foundation of various towns. The article goes through the building of the town, it's impact on the surrounding areas and important figures in the town's history.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Churches
South Haven's Historic Church (Part 2) / G. Borthwick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 7; p.9-10, 20-21; Jul. 1939.
A more detailed focus on the Brookhaven area and the South Haven Church. The article goes into great detail of how the South Haven Church has influenced the surrounding areas. It is an article that is continued into a third part.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Counterfeiting
Long Islands' Revolutionary Counterfeiting Plot / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.16-25; Spring 1962.
During the start Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress started printing specially authorized bills that would be used as currency rather than the British equivalent. Afraid of forgers, the Congress declared a death penalty for anyone caught forging new money. Isaac Ketcham and Henry Dawkins were two forgers that lived in the Cold Spring (Harbor) area.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Culture
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious education of the population of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Early Schools
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 1) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.105-106, 118; Jun. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of a small school building.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Early Schools
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.127, 129-130; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Clinton Academy, and a listing of attendance statistics.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Early Schools
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 3) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.153-155; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Huntington Academy dated in 1825.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Electric Storm
An Island wide Electric Storm / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.113; Jun. 1945.
A quick article about an electrical storm on August 12, 1895 that destroyed large portions of the island and took lives. Specific towns that had considerable damage is discussed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Preservation
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island that should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. Old Bethpage's preservation society managed to preserve a 150 acre park, as well as the Powell Farm. Huntington's historical society is noted in this article not only for it's preservation work but for also the preservation programs it started.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Cost Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Masonry
Suffolk's Earliest Masonry / S. Cooper. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 12; p.277-278; Dec. 1941.
An article about the Masons and their various lodges in Suffolk county. The author of the article was a Mason Master. An image of Hallock's Inn is featured, where the Mason's met. Article includes brief accounts of the major Masonic leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Population
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pottery
The Pottery at Huntington / R. Sammis. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 3; p.7-8, 19; Mar. 1939.
An article about Huntington's cultural influence. The article starts as the town is settled and moves through until the 19th century, explaining how Huntington became known for it's pottery. It goes into detail about individual pieces of note.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Quakers and Abolitionism
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sports
Heroes and Hurrahs: Sports in Brooklyn 1890-1898 / R. Smith. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.7-21; Spring 1975.
A detailed article of Brooklyn's athletic and recreational achievements. Gives details on both indoor and outdoor sports, and memorable games. It also lists some other towns the Brooklyn teams either played against or the towns the author compared athletics with.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 1 of 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.9-10, 19; Jan. 1939.
A detailed article that compiles a listing of storm damaged towns, and much like the American Heritage articles, explains the damage done by storms to the Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 3; p.11-12; Mar. 1939.
A continuation of a previous article, and starts in the early 1800's, where Part 2 left off (Note: Part 2 is not in our records). The article goes into detail about some of the blizzards and harsh storms on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Travels
A Trip Through Long Island in 1744 / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.103-104,117-118; Jun. 1945.
The article is a reproduction from a diary of three passengers who traveled through Long Island. The author of the article does not know who the travelers were, or why they had come to Long Island. They noted each town they stopped in.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Windmills
The Windmills of Long Island / E. Robinson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 1; p.5-10; Jan. 1940.
A short and detailed article about the location and history of the windmills of Long Island. It discusses the role windmills played over the years in the shaping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Biology
Island's Part in Biological Work / C. Davenport. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.103-104; Jun. 1944.
A short article about the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences and the role of Director Franklin Hooper in helping to make Long Island known for it's biological work. Also created was the Long Island Biological Association and the creation of the Cold Spring Harbor laboratory.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Forging
Long Islands' Revolutionary Counterfeiting Plot / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.16-25; Spring 1962.
During the start Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress started printing specially authorized bills that would be used as currency rather than the British equivalent. Afraid of forgers, the Congress declared a death penalty for anyone caught forging new money. Isaac Ketcham and Henry Dawkins were two forgers from Cold Spring that were brought to Huntington before being transferred to prison in New York City. They were held for a short time at the Nath. William's Tavern, along with Isaac and Israel Youngs and J. Anderson.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Motor Parkway
Vanderbilt's Motor Parkway / R. Wines. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.14-28; Fall 1962.
The story of the construction of the now abandoned Vanderbilt Parkway. Originally designed for safe and hazard free racing, the Vanderbilt Speedway eventually Failed. This is one of the towns where 'public' races where held, allowing motorists to use public roads. Vanderbilt thought this was asking for trouble and attempted to create a private racing road.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Presidents
Suffolk County Lured Presidents / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 2; p.7, 20-21; Mar. 1938.
An article about the Presidential influences on Long Island, including T. R. Roosevelt, William Harrison, & Ulysses S. Grant. It also includes some information about First Lady, Anna Symmes.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Whaling
Cold Spring Harbor Whaling / T. Bleecker. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 10; p.187-188; Oct. 1943.
A very short article about the whaling history in Cold Spring Harbor, and how it influenced the towns around it. The whaling industry had such an impact in the town that it lasted until about 1904, and the town's economic status was developed as a result. The town currently has several buildings dedicated to whaling history.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part 1) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.40-49; Spring 1963.
A short article about the pirates that ran the waters between Long Island and other parts of the world. The most famous pirate noted is Captain Kidd, whom was friends with the wealthiest family on the island, the Gardiners. He traveled to several towns in Long Island, picking up or dropping off his treasures as he chose.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Clocks
Hints From L.I. Clock People / P. Barrow. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.8-9; Jan. 1982.
A long and detailed article about clock making on Long Island. It gives a small history of clock making on Long Island, and how clock making has changed. It claims specific towns as having history in the clock making field.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Account Books of Henry Lloyd of the Manor of Queens Village / R. Bailey. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.26-49; Spring 1962.
Primarily an article about Henry Lloyd and Queens Village Manor (an estate connected to the English Court through Governor pensions), how important the records that Lloyd kept are to Genealogy the history of what is Lloyd's Neck, Long Island. The Manor is located between Huntington and Oyster Bay. See printing of the account books in Vol. 5, No. 3, Summer 1965, pgs. 30-34.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architects
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Privateering
Privateering by Long Islanders in the American Revolution / C. Nelson. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.25-34; Fall 1974.
A very short article about how Privateering changed the course of the American revolution when Admiral Lord Howe landed on Long Island. Mostly an overview, focusing on a few key figures, but mentions three important towns where standoffs or confirmations occurred.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Beautification
Northport Works for Civic Beauty / F. Baker. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 4; p.73-74, 80; Apr. 1941.
A detailed article about the beautification projects in Northport, including the destruction of the Old Hotel at the Northport's waterfront. The Village Board authorized the town project in order to bolster civic pride, and the outcome was the current view of Northport. Images include before and after.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Loading

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Suffolk County -- Islip

Colonial Islip Town / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 5; p.95-96, 101; May. 1941.
A detailed article about the town of Islip and it's role in colonial America. The article starts in the towns infancy, 1666, and continues until 1843. Discusses town layout, politics, and influential people. Image of St. Johns Church in Oakdale.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Life of The Early Islanders (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.45, 46-47, 57-58; Mar. 1943.
A very detailed article about the beginnings of Long Island. The article describes the founding through present day. The second part of the article focuses on the later part of the 1600s through the late 1800s. It also focuses on the governmental and architectural uniqueness of the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Early Schools
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.127, 129-130; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Clinton Academy, and a listing of attendance statistics.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Population
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Gardening
The Garden Clubs of Long Island / [No author]. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.15, 18; Oct. 1938.
An article about the various garden clubs, and the people that work hard to maintain the land around the various towns. It's also an invitation to joining the clubs.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Lion Gardiner
To The Manor Born / E. Grant. American Heritage, XXVI-6; p.85-86; Oct. 75.
The history of Lion Gardiner and his manor house in Bayshore, Long Island, Built in the 1640's . He also had homes in E. Hampton and Islip. The family still owns the manor in Bayshore.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk's South Shore-A Strong Heritage / R. Jennings. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9-11; Feb. 1982.
The article focuses on each town individually and how it relates to Suffolk County. Each town is given it's own history, and points out noted events.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Expressways and Highways
Long Island Motor Parkway: An Innovative Highway Built for High Speeds / K. Navratil. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.53; Oct. 1984.
A detailed notation of the history of the Long Island Expressway, from it's conception to it's modern state. It discusses the Vanderbuilt involvement in building the road, racing on the roadway, and how it became known for it's high-speed usage.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
Sagtikos Manor / G. Tooker. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 3; p.53-54, 56, 60; Mar. 1940.
A very detailed article about the historic Sagtikos Manor, which was built around 1697. The Manor played some part in the Revolutionary War. The family still owns the estate, though not through direct heirs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Parks
The Story of Hecksher State Park / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 7; p.159-163; Jul. 1941.
A detailed article about East Islip's establishment of a state park. The article discusses the Taylor estate, which was demolished in 1933 for the development of the park. The article also goes into detail about how the park was opposed. Images include those of the Taylor mansion, and East Beach.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Cost Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Parks
Know Your State Parks / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.13-14; Jan. 1941.
A brief article about the state parks through-out Long Island. Primarily a paragraphical listing with brief notations of what makes each park special or worth seeing.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Parks
The Stormy History of Fire Island State Park / C. Blakelock. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 9; p.233-238, 244; Oct. 1941.
A very detailed article about the history of Fire Island's state park, from it's establishment to the date of the article. The article discusses areas of Fire Island, and purchase of property for development. Images include those of the light-house, historic main street, and the Surf Hotel.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Shipwrecks
Fire Island's Historic Shipwreck / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 8; p.185-186; Aug. 1941.
A short article about the shipwreck of the Elizabeth, which claimed the life of acclaimed women's right activist Margaret Fuller. The article details a brief biography and what happened that fateful on the Elizabeth. The article also questions if a monument should be erected.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 1 of 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.9-10, 19; Jan. 1939.
A detailed article that compiles a listing of storm damaged towns, and much like the American Heritage articles, explains the damage done by storms to the Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk's South Shore-A Strong Heritage / R. Jennings. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9-11; Feb. 1982.
The article focuses on each town individually and how it relates to Suffolk County. Each town is given it's own history, and points out noted events.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Environment vs. Development: Groundwater and Land Use Planning in Nassau and Suffolk Counties / L. Koppelman. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.16-24; Fall 1997.
The article primarily focuses on Queens and Brooklyn and how proper planning and land use since World War II, while pointing out key planners in each county. The article covers land use decision between the counties since 1930 to 1987.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Expressways and Highways
Long Island Motor Parkway: An Innovative Highway Built for High Speeds / K. Navratil. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.53; Oct. 1984.
A detailed notation of the history of the Long Island Expressway, from it's conception to it's modern state. It discusses the Vanderbuilt involvement in building the road, racing on the roadway, and how it became known for it's high-speed usage.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Fullertons and the Experimental Farms of the Long Island Railroad / C. Chorzempa. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.245-253; Spring 1994.
Primarily about the rise of the Fullerton family and their ownership of the Long Island Rail Road. Certain towns noted for the demand by the public for train access to Manhattan or Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk's South Shore-A Strong Heritage / R. Jennings. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9-11; Feb. 1982.
The article focuses on each town individually and how it relates to Suffolk County. Each town is given it's own history, and points out noted events.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
The Patchogue Congregational Church (part 5) / F. Overton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 10; p.189-191; Oct. 1943.
A detailed article about the history of the Patchogue Congregational Church and it's relationship to the town. The fifth part of the article starts about 1850 and ends approximately in 1862. The article primarily contains a listing of contributions made by the Ladies Society, contributions by the Trustees, and member contributions. It also discusses the church's expansion into Sayville.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th of April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk's South Shore-A Strong Heritage / R. Jennings. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.9-11; Feb. 1982.
The article focuses on each town individually and how it relates to Suffolk County. Each town is given it's own history, and points out noted events.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
World's Largest Beeswax Plant Here / H. Suda. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.16; Jan. 1938.
A brief article about how Suffolk county has developed into one of the worlds largest beeswax plants. On average, they produce 100, 000 pounds of bleached wax per month
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Loading

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Suffolk County -- Riverhead

A Trip Through Long Island in 1744 / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.103-104,117-118; Jun. 1945.
The article is a reproduction from a diary of three passengers who traveled through Long Island. The author of the article does not know who the travelers were, or why they had come to Long Island. They noted each town they stopped in.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Old Wading River / E. Rowley. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 9; p.195-196, 201-202; Sep. 1940.
A detailed article about the history of Old Wading River, a town located in Southampton. It goes over the details of the towns settlement in 1671, and it's eventual envelopment into Riverhead and Southampton.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1791-1827) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.23-41; Spring 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Tour Continues From Riverhead to Southold (Part 2) / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.25, 28, 30; Jul. 1984.
A detailed article about the towns of Riverhead and Southold. Gives some history and what the historical societies are doing to save the historical buildings. Images of historic buildings: The Unique Barn; Cutchogue's Old House; The Pine Neck Barn; Thomas Moore House; Old Burying Ground.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Cauliflower
Cauliflower: A Million Dollar Industry / H. Talmage. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.17, 27, 33; Jan. 1938.
A very quick article about the cauliflower industry in Riverhead and how it came to be a multimillion dollar industry that fueled Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.127, 129-130; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Clinton Academy, and a listing of attendance statistics.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Gardening
The Garden Clubs of Long Island / [No author]. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.15, 18; Oct. 1938.
An article about the various garden clubs, and the people that work hard to maintain the land around the various towns. It's also an invitation to joining the clubs.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
East Hampton's Guild Hall / D. Quick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 6; p.119-120; Jun. 1940.
A summer account of East Hampton and Riverhead, and the Guild Hall. The author takes a personal view of East Hampton, and discusses the Payne House, and the 1931 opening of the Guild Hall in East Hampton in architectural detail. The article does not go into historical detail or town history, but is a personal account of the author.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Fullertons and the Experimental Farms of the Long Island Railroad / C. Chorzempa. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.245-253; Spring 1994.
Primarily about the rise of the Fullerton family and their ownership of the Long Island Rail Road. Certain towns noted for the demand by the public for train access to Manhattan or Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Orville B. Ackerly
Orville B. Ackerly Knew Suffolk / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 4; p.5-6, 14, 24; Jun. 1938.
A very detailed biographical article about Orville B. Ackerly, and his association with Suffolk County. Focus on the article is biographical.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Peconic County
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
The Case for Peconic County / F. Thiele Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.145-151; Spring 1997.
An article in support of the creation of Peconic County, a new county at the Eastern most tip of Long Island. There are several towns that would be included in this.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Presidents
Suffolk County Lured Presidents / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 2; p.7, 20-21; Mar. 1938.
An article about the Presidential influences on Long Island, including T. R. Roosevelt, William Harrison, & Ulysses S. Grant. It also includes some information about First Lady, Anna Symmes.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
An Island wide Electric Storm / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.113; Jun. 1945.
A quick article about an electrical storm on August 12, 1895 that destroyed large portions of the island and took lives. Specific towns that had considerable damage is discussed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Tour Continues From Riverhead to Southold (Part 2) / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.25, 28, 30; Jul. 1984.
A detailed article about the towns of Riverhead and Southold. Gives some history and what the historical societies are doing to save the historical buildings. Images of historic buildings: The Unique Barn; Cutchogue's Old House; The Pine Neck Barn; Thomas Moore House; Old Burying Ground.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Electric Storm
An Island wide Electric Storm / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.113; Jun. 1945.
A quick article about an electrical storm on August 12, 1895 that destroyed large portions of the island and took lives. Specific towns that had considerable damage is discussed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Loading

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Suffolk County -- Shelter Island

A Trip Through Long Island in 1744 / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.103-104,117-118; Jun. 1945.
The article is a reproduction from a diary of three passengers who traveled through Long Island. The author of the article does not know who the travelers were, or why they had come to Long Island. They noted each town they stopped in.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.127, 129-130; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Clinton Academy, and a listing of attendance statistics.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Gardening
The Garden Clubs of Long Island / [No author]. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.15, 18; Oct. 1938.
An article about the various garden clubs, and the people that work hard to maintain the land around the various towns. It's also an invitation to joining the clubs.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Lives and Identities of the Indians of Shelter Island, 1652-1835 / J. Witek. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.173-184; Spring 1992.
The detailed history of the Native Americans on Long Island, specifically the Montauk Indians of Shelter Island. Article goes over the burial grounds, pottery, and the political points.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
The Case for Peconic County / F. Thiele Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.145-151; Spring 1997.
An article in support of the creation of Peconic County, a new county at the Eastern most tip of Long Island. There are several towns that would be included in this.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Windmills
The Windmills of Long Island / E. Robinson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 1; p.5-10; Jan. 1940.
A short and detailed article about the location and history of the windmills of Long Island. It discusses the role windmills played over the years in the shaping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Loading

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Suffolk County -- Smithtown

Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1791-1827) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.23-41; Spring 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 1) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.299-230; Nov. 1940.
A detailed, but brief, article about the founding of Nassau County. It primarily focuses on the politics, governmental issues, and who was involved. The towns mentioned in the article were in relation to county development and home-towns of county leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
South Haven's Historic Church (Part 2) / G. Borthwick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 7; p.9-10, 20-21; Jul. 1939.
A more detailed focus on the Brookhaven area and the South Haven Church. The article goes into great detail of how the South Haven Church has influenced the surrounding areas. It is an article that is continued into a third part.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.127, 129-130; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Clinton Academy, and a listing of attendance statistics.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 3) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.153-155; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Huntington Academy dated in 1825.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Masonry
Suffolk's Earliest Masonry / S. Cooper. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 12; p.277-278; Dec. 1941.
An article about the Masons and their various lodges in Suffolk county. The author of the article was a Mason Master. An image of Hallock's Inn is featured, where the Mason's met. Article includes brief accounts of the major Masonic leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Peconic County
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
St. James-Setauket-Stony Brook: A North Shore Oasis of History / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.27-28; Jan. 1982.
A long article about the history of the towns listed, as well as information regarding the Witch Trials that plagued the area. The article also details tourism and industrial life for the area.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The St. James Area-A North Shore Oasis / B. Harris. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.30; Jan. 1982.
The article is one page long, and details the history of Saint James. It also details important buildings, such as the town's main church, and the school house.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Loading

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Suffolk County -- Southampton

Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Old Wading River / E. Rowley. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 9; p.195-196, 201-202; Sep. 1940.
A detailed article about the history of Old Wading River, a town located in Southampton. It goes over the details of the towns settlement in 1671, and it's eventual envelopment into Riverhead and Southampton.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1644-1770) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.13-38; Fall 1965.
A chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1771-1790) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.15-36; Winter 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
Southampton's Ancient Church / L. White. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 5; p.5-6, 12; May. 1939.
A very detailed article about the oldest church on Long Island, built in 1641. It was known as the Meeting-House, and was operated by Minister Abraham Pierson. It was rebuilt on several occasion, and rededicated in 1845. In 1925, the building caught fire, and was finally destroyed. The foundation still stands in the town of Southampton.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 1) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.105-106, 118; Jun. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of a small school building.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.127, 129-130; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Clinton Academy, and a listing of attendance statistics.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Gardening
The Garden Clubs of Long Island / [No author]. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.15, 18; Oct. 1938.
An article about the various garden clubs, and the people that work hard to maintain the land around the various towns. It's also an invitation to joining the clubs.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
The Old House on the Hill / J. Smith. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 12; p.225, 236; Dec. 1944.
An article about the Timothy Smith House, originally built around the 1770's. The article goes into detail about the history of the house, about the person who built the house (Major Isaac Smith), and the house's location today.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Hurricanes
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.102-103; Aug. 69.
A note about the hurricane damage. Notes that the private country clubs and the J. P. Morgan private island in South Hampton too heavy damage.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
Bibles and Muskets: The Acculturation of East End Native Americans in the Eighteenth Century / J. Witek. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.208-222; Spring 1994.
A very brief article about the English settlers of Long Island and the reformation and reprogramming of various Indian tribes, including the Montauk Indians, for whom a town is named.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
Bunker Fishing in Peconic Bay / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 10; p.183, 197-198; Oct. 1945.
A detailed article about fishing on Peconic Bay in Hempstead. The article primarily discusses the use of Bunkers, a fishing net that separates water into segments. The article discusses the formation of fishing companionless, and the development of fishing standards.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Peconic County
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
The Case for Peconic County / F. Thiele Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.145-151; Spring 1997.
An article in support of the creation of Peconic County, a new county at the Eastern most tip of Long Island. There are several towns that would be included in this.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part 1) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.40-49; Spring 1963.
A short article about the pirates that ran the waters between Long Island and other parts of the world. The most famous pirate noted is Captain Kidd, whom was friends with the wealthiest family on the island, the Gardiners. He traveled to several towns in Long Island, picking up or dropping off his treasures as he chose.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Presidents
Suffolk County Lured Presidents / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 2; p.7, 20-21; Mar. 1938.
An article about the Presidential influences on Long Island, including T. R. Roosevelt, William Harrison, & Ulysses S. Grant. It also includes some information about First Lady, Anna Symmes.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sailing Ships
Southampton's Strange Shipyard / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 12; p.227-228; Dec. 1945.
A short article about the building of two ships in the streets of Southampton. The ships were overly large and were linked to black market trading after disembarking from Long Island. One of the influential people in the creation of these boats is William French. They traveled around Long Island before leaving for Spain.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Whaling
Long Island Whaling / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 9; p.207-208, 211-212, 215-216; Sep. 1941.
A brief article about the maritime pursuits on Long Island, including whaling. It discusses a few towns that had an impact on the whaling business, and the regulations they helped to establish, and their competitive nature with surrounding maritime states.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Whaling
Whaling is Different Today / R. Coburn. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 1; p.5, 7-8; Jan. 1945.
A detailed article about whaling life on the various parts on Long Island, and how it has changed over the course of it's history. The primary focus of the article is on the modern view on whaling, and what kind of whales are hunted for off the coast of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part 1) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.40-49; Spring 1963.
A short article about the pirates that ran the waters between Long Island and other parts of the world. The most famous pirate noted is Captain Kidd, whom was friends with the wealthiest family on the island, the Gardiners. He traveled to several towns in Long Island, picking up or dropping off his treasures as he chose.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1791-1827) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.23-41; Spring 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
Tale of an Old Church (part 3) / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 6; p.115-116; Jun. 1942.
A continuation of "Tale of an Old Church," focusing on the structure itself and focuses on the role of the church in the Revolutionary War. Of special note is the battle that was fought on the green in front of the church by Col. Parsons.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 3) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.153-155; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Huntington Academy dated in 1825.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Flags
Bridgehampton Produced First Flag / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 7; p.153; Jul. 1940.
The article is primarily about the discovery and the display of the Bridgehampton flag. The author contends that the flag, which was 'discovered' in 1927 in the Hulbert home was the original flag for the Unites States. The article dates the flag as being from 1775. It was on display at the 1940 World's Fair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road, A Most Unique Early History / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.26, 45; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road. It gives details similar to previous articles about the Long Island Railed Road, but builds on the idea of it being a Unique part of Long Island History.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--1938 Hurricane
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.102-103; Aug. 69.
A quick note about the damage caused by the 1938 hurricane.
Illustrations or Maps: yes
 
Manhasset Highlights / D. Grant. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 5; p.97-98, 100; May. 1941.
A brief article that focuses on the founding of Manhasset, and the Dutch influence from it's founding in 1643 (aprox). It also focuses on the influence the town had on the surrounding areas. It discusses the Dutch Reformed Church, the "White House," and the first school building of the area. Other information includes the town's first newspaper, and other historical information.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious education of the population of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Journals
Long Islandiana / LIHS. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 1; p.48-57; Winter 1965.
An addendum to most of the Long Island History journals, which mostly is commentary. However, this article contains notes about the deed for Montauk and the Hamptons as the were sold from the Indians to European settlers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic Bay
Bunker Fishing in Peconic Bay / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 10; p.183, 197-198; Oct. 1945.
A detailed article about fishing on Peconic Bay in Hempstead. The article primarily discusses the use of Bunkers, a fishing net that separates water into segments. The article discusses the formation of fishing companionless, and the development of fishing standards.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part II) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.28-38; Winter 1964.
A continuation of the "Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933" where the author focus the pirates that came after Captain Kidd. These pirates, while minor on a national level, reeked havoc on Long Island they and became famous for their connections with both towns and the wealthy land owners. Captain James Gillam is among the captains listed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Modern Times
Stephen Pearl Andrews and Modern Times, Long Island / M. Stern. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 4; p.1-15; Fall 1964.
Modern Times was a small utopian village set up in Brookville Long Island. It eventually failed, due to poor economics and other hardships.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Presidents
Suffolk County Lured Presidents / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 2; p.7, 20-21; Mar. 1938.
An article about the Presidential influences on Long Island, including T. R. Roosevelt, William Harrison, & Ulysses S. Grant. It also includes some information about First Lady, Anna Symmes.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
The Case for Peconic County / F. Thiele Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.145-151; Spring 1997.
An article in support of the creation of Peconic County, a new county at the Eastern most tip of Long Island. There are several towns that would be included in this.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Hurricanes
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.13, 102; Aug. 69.
A note about the hurricane damage.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sailing Ships
Southampton's Strange Shipyard / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 12; p.227-228; Dec. 1945.
A short article about the building of two ships in the streets of Southampton. The ships were overly large and were linked to black market trading after disembarking from Long Island. One of the influential people in the creation of these boats is William French. They traveled around Long Island before leaving for Spain.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 1 of 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.9-10, 19; Jan. 1939.
A detailed article that compiles a listing of storm damaged towns, and much like the American Heritage articles, explains the damage done by storms to the Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Windmills
The Mills of Early America / E. Solane. American Heritage, VI-6; p.104-105; Oct. 55.
A brief history of the early American windmills, including some on Long Island. A woodcut of Watermill's windmill is featured in the article.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Hurricanes
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.14-15; Aug. 69.
A photograph of West Bay (Beach Club) in Long Island and the damage it took during the 1938 Hurricane.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Loading

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Suffolk County -- Southold

A Trip Through Long Island in 1744 / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.103-104,117-118; Jun. 1945.
The article is a reproduction from a diary of three passengers who traveled through Long Island. The author of the article does not know who the travelers were, or why they had come to Long Island. They noted each town they stopped in.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
First Train to Greenport, 1844 / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 11; p.203-206, 217; Nov. 1943.
A detailed article about the development of Greenport, especially that of the Long Island Rail Road expansion into Greenport. The article focuses on prominent persons who pushed for the development.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Jamaica, New York, 1656-1776: Class Structure and Social Mobility / J. Peyer. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No. 1; p.34-47; Fall 1977.
A overview article about the early days of Jamaica, which includes the development of class structures (both white and black), and the development of class movement. Other towns are referenced as examples of Jamaica's infrastructure, comparison of wealth, and overall development.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
New Faiths Come to Southold / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 8; p.149-151; Aug. 1945.
A detailed article about religious life in Southold, from the birth of the American Revolution to about 1830. The article covers the history of Methodism , Universalist, and other Christian church. Images of the Southold Universalist Church and the Methodist Church in Southold.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1644-1770) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.13-38; Fall 1965.
A chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1771-1790) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.15-36; Winter 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1791-1827) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.23-41; Spring 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Tour Continues From Riverhead to Southold (Part 2) / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.25, 28, 30; Jul. 1984.
A detailed article about the towns of Riverhead and Southold. Gives some history and what the historical societies are doing to save the historical buildings. Images of historic buildings: The Unique Barn; Cutchogue's Old House; The Pine Neck Barn; Thomas Moore House; Old Burying Ground.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
Southold Presbyterian Church / M. Homans. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.33-34; Feb. 1940.
The short and detailed history of the Southold Presbyterian Church, and it's impact on the town of Southold. The history of the church runs from 1460 to it's present day manifestation. The original church no longer stands, but the 1803 rebuild still stands. The 1803 church is a rebuild after the church expanded.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Clock and Watch Making
Hints From L.I. Clock People / P. Barrow. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.8-9; Jan. 1982.
A long and detailed article about clock making on Long Island. It gives a small history of clock making on Long Island, and how clock making has changed. It claims specific towns has having history in the clock making field.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.127, 129-130; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Clinton Academy, and a listing of attendance statistics.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Fishing
Bunker Fishing in Peconic Bay / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 10; p.183, 197-198; Oct. 1945.
A detailed article about fishing on Peconic Bay in Hempstead. The article primarily discusses the use of Bunkers, a fishing net that separates water into segments. The article discusses the formation of fishing companionless, and the development of fishing standards.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
The Benjamin Horton House / E. Wangner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 10; p.9-10, 16, 20; Oct. 1939.
A detailed article about the historical Benjamin Horton House, located in Southold. It was built around the 1660's and belonged to one of the sons of the original town's settlers. The house still stands, though it has been updated quite a bit.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
The Inventories of the Estates of Colonel John Youngs of Southold and His Son, John Jr / K. Scott. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p. 37-46; Winter 1966.
An accounting of the estate of Col. John Youngs and John Youngs, Jr. Includes bibliographical information about their travels to various towns across Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Lives and Identities of the Indians of Shelter Island, 1652-1835 / J. Witek. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.173-184; Spring 1992.
The detailed history of the Native Americans on Long Island, specifically the Montauk Indians of Shelter Island. Article goes over the burial grounds, pottery, and the political points.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
State of the Island: Peconic County: To Be or Not To Be? / R. Wunderlich. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.140-144; Spring 1997.
A quick statistical article with a numeric rundown of which towns and counties have the largest population. It goes into the debate of the creation of a new county in Long Island, called Peconic County.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Peconic County
The Case for Peconic County / F. Thiele Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.145-151; Spring 1997.
An article in support of the creation of Peconic County, a new county at the Eastern most tip of Long Island. There are several towns that would be included in this.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Old House at Cutchogue: Nearly Three Centuries Old / [No author]. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 8; p.203-205; Sep. 1941.
A pictorial essay that is meant to accompany the article found in the Oct. 1939 issue of Long Island Forum. The pictures include the interior and exterior of the house.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Old Fort at Gardiner's Island / H. Horton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 10; p.197; Oct. 1944.
A short article about the history the Fort Tyler Military Reservation on Gardiner's Island. The article is primarily a reconstruction of letters of Mary Bell, and her views on the 'Old Fort." The article also discusses Fort Wright on Plum Island, and Fort Terry on Fisher's Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
First Train to Greenport, 1844 / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 11; p.203-206, 217; Nov. 1943.
A detailed article about the development of Greenport, especially that of the Long Island Rail Road expansion into Greenport. The article focuses on prominent persons who pushed for the development. The train allowed for better movement between towns, and offered Greenport economic expansion as well.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Greenport 100 Years Old / M. Hartley. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.12; Oct. 1938.
A brief article celebrating the 100 years since Greenport's founding. It discusses the harbor, the founding in 1838, and the modern view of Greenport.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Our Story Continues: The Historic North Fork from Greenport to Orient (Part 3) / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.19, 21; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about the North Fork portion of Long Island. It is a continuation of previous articles. It gives the history of the towns of Greenport and Orient Point, and some places that lie in-between. Includes images of: Ireland Homestead (building); The Water Fountain (landmark); Berger House; Orient Slave Burial Grounds; Orient Point Inn; and Down Neck.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Try Pots and Fish Factories / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.23-24, 37; Feb. 1946.
An article about the 19th century farmer-fishermen of Suffolk County and their impact on the economic status of Long Island. The article goes into goes into detail about fish factories, the work environment, and the people involved. The article runs from the 1700s to the late 1800s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Fullertons and the Experimental Farms of the Long Island Railroad / C. Chorzempa. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.245-253; Spring 1994.
Primarily about the rise of the Fullerton family and their ownership of the Long Island Rail Road. Certain towns noted for the demand by the public for train access to Manhattan or Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Snowstorms
Adrift in the Ice Field / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.209-211; Nov. 1944.
A detailed article about the snowstorm of February 1899 that caused severe damage to Long Island. The article also focuses on various people who were affected, involved with, or had insight on the storm. Images include: Horton's Point Light House, Picture of Ice Damage, and a picture of a sailor.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Benjamin Horton House
The Benjamin Horton House / E. Wangner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 10; p.9-10, 16, 20; Oct. 1939.
A detailed article about the historical Benjamin Horton House, located in Southold. It was built around the 1660's and belonged to one of the sons of the original town's settlers. The house still stands, though it has been updated quite a bit.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Map Making
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are mentioned as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Submarine
Father of the Modern Submarine / C. Canby, R. Morris. American Heritage, XII-2; p.97-98; Feb. 61.
A detailed account of how John Holland created and used his submarine. The Goldsmith and Tuthill yards in New Suffolk is listed as the birth place of the submarine Holland.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Our Story Continues: The Historic North Fork from Greenport to Orient (Part 3) / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.19, 21; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about the North Fork portion of Long Island. It is a continuation of previous articles. It gives the history of the towns of Greenport and Orient Point, and some places that lie in-between. Includes images of: Ireland Homestead (building); The Water Fountain (landmark); Berger House; Orient Slave Burial Grounds; Orient Point Inn; and Down Neck.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Tour Continues From Riverhead to Southold (Part 2) / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.25, 28, 30; Jul. 1984.
A detailed article about the towns of Riverhead and Southold. Gives some history and what the historical societies are doing to save the historical buildings. Images of historic buildings: The Unique Barn; Cutchogue's Old House; The Pine Neck Barn; Thomas Moore House; Old Burying Ground.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Our Story Continues: The Historic North Fork from Greenport to Orient (Part 3) / T. O'Brien. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.19, 21; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about the North Fork portion of Long Island. It is a continuation of previous articles. It gives the history of the towns of Greenport and Orient Point, and some places that lie in-between. Includes images of: Ireland Homestead (building); The Water Fountain (landmark); Berger House; Orient Slave Burial Grounds; Orient Point Inn; and Down Neck.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Lion Gardiner
To The Manor Born / E. Grant. American Heritage, XXVI-6; p.9, 10; Oct. 75.
The history of Lion Gardiner and his manor house in Bayshore, Long Island, Built in the 1640's . He also once stayed overnight in Orient Point.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--1899 Snowstorm
Adrift in the Ice Field / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.209-211; Nov. 1944.
A detailed article about the snowstorm of February 1899 that caused severe damage to Long Island. The article also focuses on various people who were affected, involved with, or had insight on the storm. Images include: Horton's Point Light House, Picture of Ice Damage, and a picture of a sailor.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Fort Tyler Military
Old Fort at Gardiner's Island / H. Horton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 10; p.197; Oct. 1944.
A short article about the history the Fort Tyler Military Reservation on Gardiner's Island. The article is primarily a reconstruction of letters of Mary Bell, and her views on the 'Old Fort." The article also discusses Fort Wright on Plum Island, and Fort Terry on Fisher's Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 1 of 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.9-10, 19; Jan. 1939.
A detailed article that compiles a listing of storm damaged towns, and much like the American Heritage articles, explains the damage done by storms to the Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
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Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Brooklyn (Kings) County

A Glimpse of Brooklyn in 1826 / H. Horton. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.105, 116; Jun. 1945.
A detailed article about historic Brooklyn. The article focuses on the economic, cultural, and racial shifts that were being discovered in the 1825-1826 era. Each district is broken down and explained, as well as public services that were developing during that time.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
A Tale of Two Cities: Brooklyn and New York, 1843-1855 / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 1; p.19-34; Spring 1963.
The story of the municipal argument between Brooklyn and New York City. New York City claimed part of Brooklyn in it's charter, and when Brooklyn rebelled against it, a political and commercial war began, with the nation's Civil War battling around them.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Ah, Winter / S. Holbrook. American Heritage, VII-1; p.15-16; Dec. 55.
A short pictorial article of how Americans spend winter. A painting by Francis Guy, "Brooklynites Take In Winter," is uses as a center piece of the article.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Brooklyn As An American Theater City: 1861-1898 / S. Leiter. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 1; p.1-11; Winter/Spring 1968.
A short article based on the rise and fall of Brooklyn as a 'theater city.' Brooklyn, being in close proximity to New York City, struggled to establish itself with active programming, despite the many elaborately decorated and historical theater houses it had.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Brooklyn Fires of Yesteryear / C. Johnson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 8; p.153-154; Aug. 1942.
A brief but detailed article about the fires in historic Brooklyn. It discusses which buildings were burnt, including the Brooklyn Theater, the Roman Catholic church, and a distillery. The article also discusses how the Brooklyn fire department became one of the most well funded and versatile fire departments on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Brooklynphilia / M. Ebner. American Heritage, XXXV-5; p.6, 7; Aug. 84.
A quick correspondence (similar to a letter to the Editor) regarding the Brooklyn area and it's relationship with baseball.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Brooklyn's Changing Population in the Pre-Civil War Era / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.9-20; Spring 1964.
An article about Brooklyn's changing population dynamic, just prior to the Civil War. This includes notation about the influx of Irish, Italians, and other Europeans during the early part of the 1800's.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Brooklyn's Health and Sanitation: 1834-1855 / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.40-52; Spring 1967.
A historical account of the sanitation and the health policies of Brooklyn. It discusses hospital layouts, various epidemics that lead to policy developments, and political actions that were taken.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Brooklyn's Volunteer Fire Department / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.29-34; Summer 1966.
A detailed overview and history of the Brooklyn Volunteer Fire Department. It goes chronologically, and gives several obstacles that the fire departments encountered. These obstacles included "rowdy" youth, financial hardships, lack of paid and volunteer personnel, and pushing legislation for higher quality ("fire-resistant") buildings.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County / M. Dillard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 11; p.207-210; Nov. 1943.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Wyckoff House, Jan Martense Schenck House, Nicklaes Schenck House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 02) / M. Dillard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 12; p.227-230, 235; Dec. 1943.
A detailed article about various homes throughout Kings County, including the individual histories and images of: Stoothoff-Baxter House, Joost Van Nuyse House, Van Nuyse-Magaw, and Van Nuyse-Ditmas House. The dates of the houses range from the early 1600
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 03) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.27, 29-30; Feb. 1944.
A detailed article about various homes throughout Kings County, including the individual histories and images of: Hendrick I. Lott House, Jeromus Lott House, and Smokehouse on Lott Farm. The dates of the houses range from the early 1600's to the latest incarnation of the house. All houses are of Dutch influence, and bear Dutch names.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 05) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.91-94; May. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Van Pelt-Woosley House and the Remsen House, as well as a map of Gravesend. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 07) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 10; p.167-169; Oct. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Jost Stillwell House and Elias Hubbard Ryder House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 10) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.25-26; Feb. 1945.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: The Flatbush Church and Lefferts House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 11) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 3; p.55, 57; Mar. 1945.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: The Brooklyn Church and Vanderver Cortelyou House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Environment vs. Development: Groundwater and Land Use Planning in Nassau and Suffolk Counties / L. Koppelman. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.16-24; Fall 1997.
The article primarily focuses on Queens and Brooklyn and how proper planning and land use since World War II, while pointing out key planners in each county. The article covers land use decision between the counties since 1930 to 1987.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Heroes and Hurrahs: Sports in Brooklyn 1890-1898 / R. Smith. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.7-21; Spring 1975.
A detailed article of Brooklyn's athletic and recreational achievements. Gives details on both indoor and outdoor sports, and memorable games. It also lists some other towns the Brooklyn teams either played against or the towns the author compared athletics with.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Island's Part in Biological Work / C. Davenport. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.103-104; Jun. 1944.
A short article about the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences and the role of Director Franklin Hooper in helping to make Long Island known for it's biological work. Also created was the Long Island Biological Association and the creation of the Cold Spring Harbor laboratory.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Life of The Early Islanders (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.45, 46-47, 57-58; Mar. 1943.
A very detailed article about the beginnings of Long Island. The article describes the founding through present day. The second part of the article focuses on the later part of the 1600s through the late 1800s. It also focuses on the governmental and architectural uniqueness of the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 1: 1639-1783) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.53-76; Spring 1967.
A chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Policing the City of Brooklyn in the 1840's and 1850's / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.13-22; Spring 1966.
Details the history of the Metropolitan Police District, which officially formed in 1857. It starts with the original twelve watchmen from the early 1830s, and how it expanded (personnel and fiscally) until it was a 24-hour chartered police force. As of 1966, the Metro Police of Brooklyn work hand in hand with the New York City police department.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1771-1790) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.15-36; Winter 1966.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Administration Organization of the City of Brooklyn / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 2; p.4-16; Spring 1965.
Brooklyn, while still underdevelopment, joined together with other towns to create a Common Council that would allow for the creation of a city government, a mayor, and other important functions. Eventually, Brooklyn was able to function on it's own.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Administrative Organization of the City of Brooklyn, 1834-1855 (Part 2) / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.39-50; Fall 1965.
A continuation of the previous article of the same title, the article focuses on how Brooklyn began to take shape and form it's own governmental structure and how it separated itself from New York City. During this time, Brooklyn also combined with Williamsburgh and Bushwick, New Lotts, Flatbush, and New Utrecht, not only to pull resources but to find better ways to manage growing cities.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Black History or Black Mythology / P. Chew. American Heritage, XX-5; p.5, 6; Aug. 69.
A short article of how black history was integrated into public schools, which includes some information on who the political leaders were and how they were involved. Harlem and Brooklyn are named as popular and important demonstrational sights.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Brooklyn's Black Public Schools: Why Did Blacks Have Unusual Control Over Them / C. Mabee. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.23-38; Spring 1975.
A detailed and objective article about how Brooklyn's racial demographic played a part in helping African American's gain better control of the separated school systems. Through the hard work and determination of black Brooklynite and their white neighbors, the Brooklyn public schools raised the education level being received by black students. Many of the black students profiled in the article went on to important and powerful positions.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Andrew Carnegie
The Richman's Burden / J. Wall. American Heritage, XXI-6; p.60-62; Oct. 70.
A short account of how Andrew Carnegie came into his wealth, and why he distributed his wealth across the United States. It includes a picture of the Brooklyn Public Library, as donated by Andrew Carnegie.
Illustrations or Maps: yes
 
--Architecture
Cast Iron Architecture in Brooklyn / M. Gayle. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 12, No. 1; p.5-20; Fall 1976.
a detailed article about Brooklyn buildings, such as: The Fulton Ferry Bank, The Halsey Building, store fronts, and public buildings. Other towns are noted for taking a similar architecture, but Brooklyn's is considered to be unique. Article gives details about Williamsburgh as well.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Wrecker, Spare That Frieze / R. Gallagher. American Heritage, XVIII-5; p.61-64, p.106; Aug. 67.
A photographic account of the rescued architecture that now inhabits the Brooklyn Municipal Gardens.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Art
Our Winter Art Show / [No author]. American Heritage, XXXVII-2; p.87-88; Feb. 86.
A collection of paintings with a short descriptive article about winter and painting. One of the images includes "The City of Brooklyn" as painted by Paul Cornoger.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Bay Ridge
Old Bay Ridge / G. Glen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.1-14; Winter 1966.
A first person account of life in Bay Ridge by the author, written at the turn of the century (1898). She describes the town in great detail, about the people of Bay Ridge, and important structures of Bay Ridge. This includes the library, and historic storefronts. She describes the surrounding towns.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Biographies
Orville B. Ackerly Knew Suffolk / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 4; p.5-6, 14, 24; Jun. 1938.
A very detailed biographical article about Orville B. Ackerly, and his association with Suffolk County. Focus on the article is biographical.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Biographies
Private Yankee Doodle / J. Martin. American Heritage, XIII-3; p.35-36; Apr. 62.
(Book Excerpt) A first person, pseudo-biographical account of a Revolutionary War private who fought in several regiments. At one point, the character and his regiment landed with Washington on she shores of Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Blythebourne
Blythebourne: A Community That Was Swallowed UP / N. Litchfield. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 3; p.28-39; Summer 1964.
Because of the growth in surrounding towns, such as Brooklyn, Blythebourne eventually became an annexed part of other towns.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Boats
New York Ferry Boats / [No author]. American Heritage, X-6; p.27-28; Oct. 59.
A short historical account of the Long Island and New York City Ferry Boats. American Heritage noted Brooklyn as one of the most frequently traveled ferry-boats, as it travels between New York City, Brooklyn, and Staten Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Breslau
Breslau's First Thirty Years / L. Frevert.. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 11; p.215-216; Nov. 1945.
A detailed article about the founding of Breslau, now known as Lindenhurst, starting with it's founding in 1870. The article details how the area came to be settled, and how the Indians influenced the foundation of various towns. The article goes through the building of the town, it's impact on the surrounding areas and important figures in the town's history.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Brooklyn Bridge
[Untitled] / [No author]. American Heritage, XXV-5; p.3, 4; Aug. 74.
Front cover of American Heritage, Volume 25, Issue 5 shows a painting of the Brooklyn Bridge.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Brooklyn Bridge
New York Ferry Boats / [No author]. American Heritage, X-6; p.30-31; Oct. 59.
A short historical account of the Long Island and New York City Ferry Boats. American Heritage noted Brooklyn as one of the most frequently traveled ferry-boats, as it travels between New York City, Brooklyn, and Staten Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Brooklyn Bridge
The Treasure from the Carpentry Shop / D. McCullough. American Heritage, XXXI-1; p.18-29; Dec. 79.
A very well documented history of the Brooklyn Bridge's original architect and designer, including biographical information. McCullough included the original designs for the Brooklyn Bridge that eventually killed it's creator.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Brooklyn Bridge
When They Built the Big Bridge / F. Brown. American Heritage, VII-6; p.69-73, p.110-112; Oct. 56.
A detailed historical account of the building of the Brooklyn Bridge, and the involvement of John Roebling and his eldest son. The article covers from the conception, to the design, to the building, and to the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge. It also details the death of John Roebling, who designed the bridge, and the illness of his son while they worked on the bridge.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Cemeteries
Calm Dwellings / D. Standard. American Heritage, XXX-5; p.46-53; Aug. 79.
A short account of how American graveyards went from simple places of mourning to elaborate parks with picnics. He also discusses how grave markers went from simple to elaborate, especially for the middle-class American. The photograph accompanying the article is of Woodlawn Cemetery in Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
Little Portion Monastery / J. Jenkins. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.233-234, 236; Nov. 1940.
A short article about a small the history of a Episcopal Perish in the Vicinity of Mt. Sinai. The article goes into detail about the people who created the church, when it became a monastery advocating the poor, and it's current relation to the surrounding communities.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a notation that the church is still an active part of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and the Civil War / D. Cory. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.1-15; Spring 1962.
A detailed article about the involvement of Brooklyn in the "Great Rebellion" (Civil War). It discuses first about the rapid growth of Brooklyn and the political tension in the area. As the start of the war became hostile (here categorized as the attack on Fort Sumter (04/12/1861)), Brooklyn becomes involved in the battle of Bull Run with the deployment of their 14th Army Regiment and militia. But this wasn't the only regiment that was deployed to protect the interest of the North. Includes reprints of a typical Brooklyn Solider, John Vliet.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
The Friel Civil War Letters / D. Cory. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 1; p.18-26; Winter 1965.
Much like the John Vilet letters, the Friel letters reflect the personal side of the Civil War. Unlike Vilet, the Daniel and Hugh Friel were the children of Irish immigrants, and did not live in Brooklyn until after the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Coney Island
A Greeting from Coney Island / [No author]. American Heritage, XV-2; p.50-51; Feb. 75.
A photographic essay of the people and summers in Coney Island, particularly the upper and middle class. Brooklyn was mentioned due to the fact that a historical building was moved from Brooklyn to Coney Island .
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Crescent Athletic Club
Room 10, Crescent. A.C. / S. George. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.4; Jan. 1938.
A quick article about the Crescent Athletic Club, an atypically historic sight in Brooklyn. Gives details about a Room 10, where the prominent players in Long Island's history meet.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 3) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.153-155; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Huntington Academy dated in 1825.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Schooldays in Brooklyn in the Early 1900's / C. Jacob, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8. No. 2; p.30-38; Summer/Fall 1968.
A biographical article of a student in the early portion of the twentieth century who attended public school in Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Fighting
Jeff, It's Up to You / F. Farr. American Heritage, XV-2; p.76-77; Feb. 64.
(Book Review) An short review of the book, Jeff, It's Up to You, which describes the events leading up to, the day of, and the days after the 1910 fight (boxing) between Jack Johnson and Jim Jeffries. The review notes that Brooklyn was the scene of riots after Johnson defeated Jefferies at the end of the fight.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Flatbush
Flatbush / D. Tredwell. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 4; p.40-47; Fall 1964.
An observational account of Flatbush's growth. At one point, it was a suburb of Brooklyn, quieter and slightly run down. However, by the 1960's it was flourishing and a popular place for building communities.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Frank Bannerman
The Great Gun Merchant / J. Perisco. American Heritage, XXV-5; p.52-54; Aug. 74.
A biographical account of the life of Frank Bannerman. He was a gun merchant in New York City, selling arms to international militia groups. He closed his office in NYC and moved to Blue Point, Long Island. His small fortress of a home and business eventually became Bannerman's Military Museum. Brooklyn named as a place he visited.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Frederic Remington
Frederic Remington's Wild West / B. Dippie. American Heritage, XXVI-3; p.11, 12; Apr. 75.
A small pictorial and biographical account of New York City based artist Frederic Remington who painted scenes from the Wild West (western United States). He lived in Brooklyn for a short time, but produced some paintings while there. He was also a good friend to President Theodore Roosevelt.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Unexpected Mrs. Stowe / D. McCullough. American Heritage, XXIV-5; p.76-79; Aug. 73.
A detailed biographical account of Harriet Beacher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Discusses her writing, political views, painting, home life, and her travels after writing Uncle Tom's Cabin, which included a stop in Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: yes
 
--Historic Buildings
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island that should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. In Brooklyn, special consideration is noted for Webb House.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Horse Racing
Early Horse Racing on Long Island / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.27, 29-30,37; Feb. 1945.
A short article about the horse racing on Long Island. The article focuses on the people that worked on getting horse racing up and running rather than the direct impact on the towns, especially August Belmont. The article compares Long Island racing to the Lexington and Kentucky racing parks.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The $24 Swindle / N. Benchley. American Heritage, XI-1; p.63, 93; Dec. 59.
A historical account of the purchase of Manhattan Island and Brooklyn from the Weekquaesgeek Indians by the Dutch in 1626; Since the Native Americans did not believe they owned the land, they could not officially sell it. However, the tribe leader allowed the Dutch to purchase the land for $24, never telling the Dutch that the land wasn't his to sell. Makes a note that the Weekquaesgeek Indians are part of the Montauk/Algonquin tribe.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Industrialization
A Set of Mere Money-Getters / A. Nevins. American Heritage, XIV-4; p.50-51, p.105-108; Jun. 63.
A short essay with an alternative views on the nineteenth century tycoons (of varied industries). The author notes that New York City played a major force in their fortune hunting, as well as the personal development of the rich. As an example, he cites Andrew Carnegie who donated millions of dollars and built libraries across the country, including the Brooklyn Public Library.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are listed as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--John Vliet
A Brooklyn Soldier A Century Ago: Part 1 / D. Cory. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.29-54; Spring 1962.
A supplement to the previous article, "Brooklyn and the Civil War," this article continues the letters published in brief by John Vliet. Vilet was a Brooklynite who went to war in 1861. The letters start in 1862, and correspond with his former employer, Chas. Collins, and others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--John Vliet
A Brooklyn Soldier A Century Ago: Part 2 / D. Cory. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p1.-30; Spring 1963.
A secondary supplement to the previous article, "Brooklyn and the Civil War," this article continues the letters published in brief by John Vliet. Vilet was a Brooklynite who went to war in 1861. The letters start in 1862, and correspond with his former employer, Chas. Collins, and others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--John Vliet
A Brooklyn Soldier A Century Ago: Part 3 / D. Cory. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 3; p.1-27; Summer 1964.
A third supplement to the previous article, "Brooklyn and the Civil War," this article continues the letters published in brief by John Vliet. Vilet was a Brooklynite who went to war in 1861. The letters start in 1862, and correspond with his former employer, Chas. Collins, and others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Fullertons and the Experimental Farms of the Long Island Railroad / C. Chorzempa. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.245-253; Spring 1994.
Primarily about the rise of the Fullerton family and their ownership of the Long Island Rail Road. Certain towns noted for the demand by the public for train access to Manhattan or Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road, A Most Unique Early History / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.26, 45; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road. It gives details similar to previous articles about the Long Island Railed Road, but builds on the idea of it being a Unique part of Long Island History.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island University
The Beginning of Long Island University / E. Gatner. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No.1; p.4-33; Fall 1977.
The early years of Long Island University, including the scouting of locations on Long Island, and outside of Brooklyn. Article primarily about the Brooklyn campus, which was the original campus.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Manhasset
Manhasset Highlights / D. Grant. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 5; p.97-98, 100; May. 1941.
A brief article that focuses on the founding of Manhasset, and the Dutch influence from it's founding in 1643 (aprox). It also focuses on the influence the town had on the surrounding areas. It discusses the Dutch Reformed Church, the "White House," and the first school building of the area. Other information includes the town's first newspaper, and other historical information.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Midwout
A Village Called Midwout / M. Dilliard. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.6-24; Fall 1974.
A detailed article about a lost town of Long Island, known as Midwout. The article discusses the Dutch settlement, the attempted annexes by other towns, and it's eventual development into becoming part of Flatbush. Other towns are listed in the article as influences on how Midwout was developed, run, and political base.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Newspapers
Newspapers As a Neglected Source / R. Winsche. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.15-28; Summer 1966.
This article runs chronologically and detailed account of important newspapers from important towns. Some newspapers have been destroyed by fire, flood, or plain neglect. It also includes notations when newspapers changed hands, changed coverage towns, or changed titles.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part II) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.28-38; Winter 1964.
A continuation of the "Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933" where the author focus the pirates that came after Captain Kidd. These pirates, while minor on a national level, reeked havoc on Long Island they and became famous for their connections with both towns and the wealthy land owners. Captain James Gillam is among the captains listed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Recreation
Simple Pleasures and Social Rendezvous: The Art of Urban Social Mingling / R. Smith. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 15, No. 1; p.25-37; Fall 1978.
A brief article about the recreational and cultural influences on Brooklyn other developing areas. Article was general, and often noted known activities, and did not cite anything unique.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sailing Ships
Brooklyn's Great Shipyards / F. Hewens. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 5; p.111-112; May. 1941.
A short but detailed article about the history of Brooklyn's waterfront, especially the shipyard. The shipyard played an active role in the city's history. The article gives a detailed history of the shipyard itself, from the small boats to the National Defense commission. Today, Brooklyn and it's shipyard play a great deal to the country's defense.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sailing Ships
The Miracle That Saved a Union / S. Adams. American Heritage, XXVII-1; p.77-79; Dec. 75.
A very well documented account of the Monitor, a battleship that was build in the Brooklyn Navel Yards and sent off to battle in the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Scott and Van Altena
Scott and Van Altena, Masters of the Song Slide / H. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 3; p.17-27; Spring 1965.
A biographical account of John D. Scott and Edward Van Altena, native Brooklynite who painted music slides and eventually went into their own business. Music slides were colorful music sheets that were shown to the audiences in movie theaters between reel changes.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Social Classes
American Vernacular / D. Plowden. American Heritage, XXV-5; p.46 -47; Aug. 74.
A photographic essay of Americana and middle-class American life, which includes a picture of a warehouse in Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Steamboats
Some Recent Steamboat Disasters on Long Island Sound and the East River / E. Dunbaugh. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.1-14; Summer 1966.
A quick article about the steamboat accidents over the last 100 years, and describing what happened to cause them. It also re-evaluates the accident of General Slocum, which was lost after 3 large accidents. The article primarily focuses on New York City.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
Adrift in the Ice Field / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 11; p.209-211; Nov. 1944.
A detailed article about the snowstorm of February 1899 that caused severe damage to Long Island. The article also focuses on various people who were affected, involved with, or had insight on the storm. Images include: Horton's Point Light House, Picture of Ice Damage, and a picture of a sailor.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Storms
Historic Storms and Gales on Island (Part 1 of 3) / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 1; p.9-10, 19; Jan. 1939.
A detailed article that compiles a listing of storm damaged towns, and much like the American Heritage articles, explains the damage done by storms to the Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Midwout
A Village Called Midwout / M. Dilliard. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.6-24; Fall 1974.
A detailed article about a lost town of Long Island, known as Midwout. The article discusses Midwout's Dutch settlement, it's attempted annexes by other towns, and it's eventual integration into Flatbush. Other towns are mentioned in the article as influences on how Midwout was developed, run, and political base.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Old Bay Ridge / G. Glen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.1-14; Winter 1966.
A first person account of life in Bay Ridge by the author, written at the turn of the century (1898). She describes the town in great detail, about the people of Bay Ridge, and important structures of Bay Ridge. This includes the library, and historic storefronts. She describes the surrounding towns.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Blythebourne: A Community That Was Swallowed UP / N. Litchfield. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 3; p.28-39; Summer 1964.
Because of the growth in surrounding towns, such as Brooklyn, Blythebourne eventually became an annexed part of other towns.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Beaches
Once More On To The Beach / G. Carson. American Heritage, XXII-5; p.61, 62; Aug. 71.
A short article on the allure of American beaches, focusing on the beaches of New York. Covers an account of why swimming and beach sports are fun, female fashions, and quick facts. Image accompanying the article is that of Brighton Beach Hotel on Coney Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Louis Philippe
Louis Philippe in America / M. Bishop. American Heritage, XX-3; p.95-69; Apr. 69.
A biographical account of the future king of France while he toured the United States. He visited New York City, and Long Island, making a small stop-over in Brighton.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Williamsburgh
Williamsburgh in the Early Nineteenth Century: Failure in Suburban Growth / B. Danforth. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 15, No. 1; p.5-15; Fall 1978.
An article the founding and the economic hardship of Williamsburgh, with a primary focus on post-Revolutionary Williamsburgh, particularly the early to mid 1800s. The town did not flourish like it's neighbor, Brooklyn Heights, and the author examines why.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Early History of Brownsville / A. Landsman. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.18-27; Winter 1964.
A very brief article of the founding of Brownville, from the Dutch family to the end of the 1800's. No other specific towns are named, however there are some notes about the founders of various towns and the wealthy families in the area.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Administration Organization of the City of Brooklyn / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 2; p.4-16; Spring 1965.
Brooklyn, while still underdevelopment, joined together with other towns to create a Common Council that would allow for the creation of a city government, a mayor, and other important functions. Eventually, Brooklyn was able to function on it's own.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Administrative Organization of the City of Brooklyn, 1834-1855 (Part 2) / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.39-50; Fall 1965.
A continuation of the previous article of the same title, the article focuses on how Brooklyn began to take shape and form it's own governmental structure and how it separated itself from New York City. During this time, Brooklyn also combined with Williamsburgh and Bushwick, New Lotts, Flatbush, and New Utrecht, not only to pull resources but to find better ways to manage growing cities.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a notation that the church is still an active part of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
A Greeting from Coney Island / R. Snow. American Heritage, XXVI-2; p.49-55; Feb. 75.
A photographic essay of the people and summers in Coney Island, particularly the upper and middle class.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
A Saga of Coney Island / K. Strong. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.109, 112; Jun. 1945.
A short article about 'buried treasure' in Coney Island. The article focuses on the family Johnson that attempted to outsmart both pirates and officials over $ 5, 000 in buried loot. The Johnson's attempted to retrieve their ill-gotten goods later on, but was not successful. It was later found in 1842 by Jacob Skidmore.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Birdwatchers: 1931 / [No author]. American Heritage, XVIII-4; p.2, 4; Jun. 67.
A picture of a contestant the 1931 Modern Venus Contest at Coney Island
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Heroes and Hurrahs: Sports in Brooklyn 1890-1898 / R. Smith. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.7-21; Spring 1975.
A detailed article of Brooklyn's athletic and recreational achievements. Gives details on both indoor and outdoor sports, and memorable games. It also lists some other towns the Brooklyn teams either played against or the towns the author compared athletics with.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Master Showman of Coney Island / P. Lyon. American Heritage, IX-4; p.14-21, p.92-95; Jun. 58.
A semi-biographical account of George Tilyou and the building of a family friendly retreat on Coney Island. It gave the history of Coney Island, and what happened to Tilyou's park
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Master Showman of Coney Island / P. Lyon. American Heritage, IX-4; p.15-21, p.93-94; Jun. 58.
A semi-biographical account of George Tilyou and the building of a family friendly retreat on Coney Island. It gave the history of Coney Island, and what happened to Tilyou's park
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Pictures Worth a Second Look / [No author]. American Heritage, XVIII-6; p.51-52; Oct. 67.
A collection of pictures that made an impact with the American Heritage editor. A repeat of the Modern Venus Contest.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Year In Pictures: 1885 / R. Snow. American Heritage, XXXVI-1; p.64-65; Dec. 84.
A photographic essay of the year 1885, including the opening of Coney Island's large hollow steel and wood elephant at Steeplechase. Snow noted that the reason it was build was to draw extra cash from unsuspecting tourists by offering an overhead view of Steeplechase.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Beaches
Once More On To The Beach / G. Carson. American Heritage, XXII-5; p.61, 80; Aug. 71.
A short article on the allure of American beaches, focusing on the beaches of New York. Covers an account of why swimming and beach sports are fun, female fashions, and quick facts. Includes an image of Coney Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Blythebourne
Blythebourne: A Community That Was Swallowed UP / N. Litchfield. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 3; p.28-39; Summer 1964.
Because of the growth in surrounding towns, such as Brooklyn, Blythebourne eventually became an annexed part of other towns.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Boer
The Boer Come to Brooklyn / R. Snow. American Heritage, XXVII-3; p.96-97; Apr. 76.
A quick note about the show "Boer War" which toured Brooklyn. This is a subset of the article Taking Sides in The Boer War, by B. Farwell.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Martin Couney
Martin Couney / R. Snow. American Heritage, XXXII-4; p.90-91; Jun. 81.
Martin Couney invented an incubation system for premature babies, first in Germany, and then moved to Long Island. On Coney Island, he had a "walkthrough" exhibit that tourists could see the pre-mature babies at a cost. He never charged the parents of the babies for his services. He saved the majority of the babies in his care, but eventually closed his exhibit due to hospitals finally opening up their own facilities.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Recreation
Simple Pleasures and Social Rendezvous: The Art of Urban Social Mingling / R. Smith. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 15, No. 1; p.25-37; Fall 1978.
A brief article about the recreational and cultural influences on Brooklyn other developing areas. Article was general, and often noted known activities, and did not cite anything unique.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Reginald Marsh
Reginald Marsh / E. Laning. American Heritage, XXIII-6; p.16, 33, 92; Oct. 72.
A bibliographic essay sketcher Reginald Marsh and his exploits in New York City, Coney Island, and Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Thomas Edison
From Pearl Street to Main St. / R. Snow. American Heritage, XXX-1; p.79-80; Nov. 79.
A photographic essay of Thomas Edison's endeavor to light up America. Photograph of Long Island's Luney Park is featured.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 02) / M. Dillard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 12; p.227-230, 235; Dec. 1943.
A detailed article about various homes throughout Kings County, including the individual histories and images of: Stoothoff-Baxter House, Joost Van Nuyse House, Van Nuyse-Magaw, and Van Nuyse-Ditmas House. The dates of the houses range from the early 1600
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 09) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 12; p.233-235; Dec. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Gerritsen's Tide Mill and Wyckoff-Bennett House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 10) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.25-26; Feb. 1945.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: The Flatbush Church and Lefferts House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 11) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 3; p.55, 57; Mar. 1945.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: The Brooklyn Church and Vanderver Cortelyou House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Flatbush / D. Tredwell. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 4; p.40-47; Fall 1964.
An observational account of Flatbush's growth. At one point, it was a suburb of Brooklyn, quieter and slightly run down. However, by the 1960's it was flourishing and a popular place for building communities.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Heroes and Hurrahs: Sports in Brooklyn 1890-1898 / R. Smith. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.7-21; Spring 1975.
A detailed article of Brooklyn's athletic and recreational achievements. Gives details on both indoor and outdoor sports, and memorable games. It also lists some other towns the Brooklyn teams either played against or the towns the author compared athletics with.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 1: 1639-1783) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.53-76; Spring 1967.
A chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Administrative Organization of the City of Brooklyn, 1834-1855 (Part 2) / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.39-50; Fall 1965.
A continuation of the previous article of the same title, the article focuses on how Brooklyn began to take shape and form it's own governmental structure and how it separated itself from New York City. During this time, Brooklyn also combined with Williamsburgh and Bushwick, New Lotts, Flatbush, and New Utrecht, not only to pull resources but to find better ways to manage growing cities.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a notation that the church is still an active part of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 3) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.153-155; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Huntington Academy dated in 1825.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Midwout
A Village Called Midwout / M. Dilliard. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.6-24; Fall 1974.
A detailed article about a lost town of Long Island, known as Midwout. The article discusses the Dutch settlement, the attempted annexes by other towns, and it's eventual development into becoming part of Flatbush. Other towns are listed in the article as influences on how Midwout was developed, run, and political base.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part II) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.28-38; Winter 1964.
A continuation of the "Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933" where the author focus the pirates that came after Captain Kidd. These pirates, while minor on a national level, reeked havoc on Long Island they and became famous for their connections with both towns and the wealthy land owners. Captain James Gillam is among the captains listed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Recreation
Simple Pleasures and Social Rendezvous: The Art of Urban Social Mingling / R. Smith. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 15, No. 1; p.25-37; Fall 1978.
A brief article about the recreational and cultural influences on Brooklyn other developing areas. Article was general, and often noted known activities, and did not cite anything unique.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County / M. Dillard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 11; p.207-210; Nov. 1943.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Wyckoff House, Jan Martense Schenck House, Nicklaes Schenck House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 02) / M. Dillard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 12; p.227-230, 235; Dec. 1943.
A detailed article about various homes throughout Kings County, including the individual histories and images of: Stoothoff-Baxter House, Joost Van Nuyse House, Van Nuyse-Magaw, and Van Nuyse-Ditmas House. The dates of the houses range from the early 1600's to the latest incarnation of the house. All houses are of Dutch influence, and bear Dutch names.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 03) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.27, 29-30; Feb. 1944.
A detailed article about various homes throughout Kings County, including the individual histories and images of: Hendrick I. Lott House, Jeromus Lott House, and Smokehouse on Lott Farm. The dates of the houses range from the early 1600's to the latest incarnation of the house. All houses are of Dutch influence, and bear Dutch names.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 05) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.91-94; May. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Van Pelt-Woosley House and the Remsen House, as well as a map of Gravesend. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 06) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.151-152, 156; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s. Images include: Abraham Emans House, The Hubbard House, and Agnes Lake House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 08) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 10; p.189-191; Oct. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Ryder-Van Cleff House, Stephen Voris House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Old Bay Ridge / G. Glen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.1-14; Winter 1966.
A first person account of life in Bay Ridge by the author, written at the turn of the century (1898). She describes the town in great detail, about the people of Bay Ridge, and important structures of Bay Ridge. This includes the library, and historic storefronts. She describes the surrounding towns.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Stanton Island
The Island in the Bay / A. Robertson. American Heritage, XVII-5; p.25-26; Aug. 66.
A short article about Stanton Island and it's history. The painting in the foreground is of Fort Hamilton in Brooklyn.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 03) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.27, 29-30; Feb. 1944.
A detailed article about various homes throughout Kings County, including the individual histories and images of: Hendrick I. Lott House, Jeromus Lott House, and Smokehouse on Lott Farm. The dates of the houses range from the early 1600's to the latest incarnation of the house. All houses are of Dutch influence, and bear Dutch names.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Revolutionary War
Private Yankee Doodle / J. Martin. American Heritage, XIII-3; p.35-36; Apr. 62.
(Book Excerpt) A first person, pseudo-biographical account of a Revolutionary War private who fought in several regiments. Gowanus Creek is mentioned in the caption of a woodcut image.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County / M. Dillard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 11; p.207-210; Nov. 1943.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Wyckoff House, Jan Martense Schenck House, Nicklaes Schenck House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 05) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.91-94; May. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Van Pelt-Woosley House and the Remsen House, as well as a map of Gravesend. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 06) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.151-152, 156; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s. Images include: Abraham Emans House, The Hubbard House, and Agnes Lake House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 07) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 10; p.167-169; Oct. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Jost Stillwell House and Elias Hubbard Ryder House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 08) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 10; p.189-191; Oct. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Ryder-Van Cleff House, Stephen Voris House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 09) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 12; p.233-235; Dec. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Gerritsen's Tide Mill and Wyckoff-Bennett House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Flushing's Early History / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 10; p.209-210, 212, 214; Oct. 1941.
A detailed article about the founding of Flushing, and it's impact on other local towns. The article details the involvement of Flushing in the Revolutionary War, important figures in Flushing (Long Island) history, with an overview of what made Flushing what it is today.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Heroes and Hurrahs: Sports in Brooklyn 1890-1898 / R. Smith. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.7-21; Spring 1975.
A detailed article of Brooklyn's athletic and recreational achievements. Gives details on both indoor and outdoor sports, and memorable games. It also lists some other towns the Brooklyn teams either played against or the towns the author compared athletics with.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 1: 1639-1783) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.53-76; Spring 1967.
A chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a notation that the church is still an active part of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious education of the population of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Horse Racing
The Great Racetrack Caper / R. Jarman. American Heritage, XIX-5; p.24, 92-94; Aug. 68.
A detailed account of the infighting, betting, and fights between the horse jockeys and bookies at Gravesend Racetrack, and the account of how Officer De Lacy attempted to end the feuding on both sides.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--John Youngs
The Inventories of the Estates of Colonel John Youngs of Southold and His Son, John Jr / K. Scott. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p. 37-46; Winter 1966.
An accounting of the estate of Col. John Youngs and John Youngs, Jr. Includes bibliographical information about their travels to various towns across Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Midwout
A Village Called Midwout / M. Dilliard. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.6-24; Fall 1974.
A detailed article about a lost town of Long Island, known as Midwout. The article discusses the Dutch settlement, the attempted annexes by other towns, and it's eventual development into becoming part of Flatbush. Other towns are listed in the article as influences on how Midwout was developed, run, and political base.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part II) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.28-38; Winter 1964.
A continuation of the "Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933" where the author focus the pirates that came after Captain Kidd. These pirates, while minor on a national level, reeked havoc on Long Island they and became famous for their connections with both towns and the wealthy land owners. Captain James Gillam is among the captains listed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Slavery
Slavery on Long Island: A Study of Economic Motivation / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.1-12; Spring 1966.
A quick article about the history of slavery on Long Island. Several towns are listed as having been noted in their census for to be slave holding towns. Traditionally, and unlike the south, slaves in Long Island were hose-hold slaves. During the economical changes (early to late 1800s), the slavery was abolished, but slaves were paid next to nothing or nothing at all.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dutch Settlements
A Village Called Midwout / M. Dilliard. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.6-24; Fall 1974.
A detailed article about a lost town of Long Island, known as Midwout. The article discusses the Dutch settlement, the attempted annexes by other towns, and it's eventual development into becoming part of Flatbush. Other towns are listed in the article as influences on how Midwout was developed, run, and political base.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Dutch Houses of Kings County / M. Dillard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 11; p.207-210; Nov. 1943.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Wyckoff House, Jan Martense Schenck House, Nicklaes Schenck House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Administration Organization of the City of Brooklyn / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 2; p.4-16; Spring 1965.
Brooklyn, while still underdevelopment, joined together with other towns to create a Common Council that would allow for the creation of a city government, a mayor, and other important functions. Eventually, Brooklyn was able to function on it's own.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Administrative Organization of the City of Brooklyn, 1834-1855 (Part 2) / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.39-50; Fall 1965.
A continuation of the previous article of the same title, the article focuses on how Brooklyn began to take shape and form it's own governmental structure and how it separated itself from New York City. During this time, Brooklyn also combined with Williamsburg and Bushwick, New Lotts, Flatbush, and New Utrecht, not only to pull resources but to find better ways to manage growing cities.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 08) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 10; p.189-191; Oct. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Ryder-Van Cleff House, Stephen Voris House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 10) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.25-26; Feb. 1945.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: The Flatbush Church and Lefferts House.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Old Bay Ridge / G. Glen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p.1-14; Winter 1966.
A first person account of life in Bay Ridge by the author, written at the turn of the century (1898). She describes the town in great detail, about the people of Bay Ridge, and important structures of Bay Ridge. This includes the library, and historic storefronts. She describes the surrounding towns.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Administration
The Administration Organization of the City of Brooklyn / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 2; p.4-16; Spring 1965.
Brooklyn, while still underdevelopment, joined together with other towns to create a Common Council that would allow for the creation of a city government, a mayor, and other important functions. Eventually, Brooklyn was able to function on it's own.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Administration
The Administrative Organization of the City of Brooklyn, 1834-1855 (Part 2) / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.39-50; Fall 1965.
A continuation of the previous article of the same title, the article focuses on how Brooklyn began to take shape and form it's own governmental structure and how it separated itself from New York City. During this time, Brooklyn also combined with Williamsburg and Bushwick, New Lotts, Flatbush, and New Utrecht, not only to pull resources but to find better ways to manage growing cities.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dutch Houses
Dutch Houses of Kings County / M. Dillard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 11; p.207-210; Nov. 1943.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Wyckoff House, Jan Martense Schenck House, Nicklaes Schenck House. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Dutch Houses
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 02) / M. Dillard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 12; p.227-230, 235; Dec. 1943.
A detailed article about various homes throughout Kings County, including the individual histories and images of: Stoothoff-Baxter House, Joost Van Nuyse House, Van Nuyse-Magaw, and Van Nuyse-Ditmas House. The dates of the houses range from the early 1600s
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Dutch Reform Church
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dutch Reform Church
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a notation that the church is still an active part of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th of April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Midwout
A Village Called Midwout / M. Dilliard. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.6-24; Fall 1974.
A detailed article about a lost town of Long Island, known as Midwout. The article discusses the Dutch settlement, the attempted annexes by other towns, and it's eventual development into becoming part of Flatbush. Other towns are listed in the article as influences on how Midwout was developed, run, and political base.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Administrative Organization of the City of Brooklyn, 1834-1855 (Part 2) / J. Judd. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.39-50; Fall 1965.
A continuation of the previous article of the same title, the article focuses on how Brooklyn began to take shape and form it's own governmental structure and how it separated itself from New York City. During this time, Brooklyn also combined with Williamsburg and Bushwick, New Lotts, Flatbush, and New Utrecht, not only to pull resources but to find better ways to manage growing cities.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Williamsburgh in the Early Nineteenth Century: Failure in Suburban Growth / B. Danforth. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 15, No. 1; p.5-15; Fall 1978.
An article about the founding and the economic hardship of Williamsburg, with a primary focus on post-Revolutionary Williamsburg, particularly the early to mid 1800s. The town did not flourish like it's neighbor, Brooklyn Heights, and the author examines why.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Cast Iron Architecture in Brooklyn / M. Gayle. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 12, No. 1; p.5-20; Fall 1976.
A detailed article about Brooklyn buildings, such as: The Fulton Ferry Bank, The Halsey Building, store fronts, and public buildings. Other towns are noted for taking a similar architecture, but Brooklyn's is considered to be unique. Article gives details about Williamsburgh as well.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Ice Skating
American on Ice / D. Button. American Heritage, XIV-2; p.48-49; Feb. 63.
A brief note about America's fascination with ice skating. A lithograph by Thomas and Eno done in 1863 depicts ice skaters in Williamsburgh, Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Loading

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Queens County

Suffolk, Ocean Bulwark of State / C. Ditmars. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.5-6, 14, 18-22; Jan. 1938.
An article that discusses the establishment of Suffolk county, along with a quick note about the towns established in the county. A large part of the article notates Montauk Point.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
-- Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
-- Historic Homes
Don't Tear That Old House Down! / P. Dunbar. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.1-13; Fall 1962.
An article written in protest against the deliberate destruction of historic homes and buildings by towns looking to expand or develop (either private or commercial). Several towns are noted by the author as having many historical buildings, and notes that not only is it part of Long Island heritage, but adds drive for tourism. He also notes that each area of Long Island has its own architectural history that is unique and distinct to New York. His goal is to enact a state recognized committee for the controlled declaration of historic (and untouchable districts).
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
-- Historic Preservation
Historic Preservation on Long Island / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.1-8; Spring 1964.
A very short article with heavy detail about what buildings and historic places on Long Island that should be preserved. Special notes are made for specific towns. In Queens, urbanization has gotten to the point where the preservation societies are unable to save such places as the Bowne House or the Friends Meeting House.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
-- Industrialization
Industrial Zone for Island / M. Dobson. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 2; p.25-26, 30; Feb. 1941.
A very detailed article about the industrial boom on Long Island, focusing on several towns that have seen expansion recently. The towns listed are mentioned as having had an impact on the industrial changes on Long Island. It also discusses the National Defense Program's influences, as well as the Department of Education, and the Long Island Rail Road's influence.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
-- Land Use
Environment vs. Development: Groundwater and Land Use Planning in Nassau and Suffolk Counties / L. Koppelman. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.16-24; Fall 1997.
The article primarily focuses on Queens and Brooklyn and how proper planning and land use since World War II, while pointing out key planners in each county. The article covers land use decision between the counties since 1930 to 1987.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
-- Laws
Old Laws of New York / J. Merritt. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.115-116; Jun. 1944.
A short article about the historical laws of New York, with specific mentions of some Long Island towns. It discusses how some laws came into effect, the difference between English and Dutch laws, and how laws changed through out the years.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
-- Motor Parkway
Vanderbilt's Motor Parkway / R. Wines. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 2, No. 2; p.14-28; Fall 1962.
The story of the construction of the now abandoned Vanderbilt Parkway. Originally designed for safe and hazard free racing, the Vanderbilt Speedway eventually Failed. Queens was an area that Vanderbilt was attempting to connect to his private race way, in order to make it a longer drive.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
-- Long Island University
The Beginning of Long Island University / E. Gatner. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No.1; p.4-33; Fall 1977.
An article discussing the early years of Long Island University, including the scouting for locations on Long Island and outside of Brooklyn. This article is primarily about the Brooklyn campus, which was the original campus.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Parson Blake
Parson Blake and the Farmer's Wife / M. Steer. American Heritage, XVI-4; p.42-45; Jun. 65.
A biographical account of the life of a farmer's wife. The article discusses the influence of the writings of John Black and compares each of his pieces.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Gardening
The Garden Clubs of Long Island / [No author]. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 8; p.15, 18; Oct. 1938.
An article about the various garden clubs, and the people that work hard to maintain the land around the various towns. It's also an invitation to joining the clubs.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Dutch Were Sturdy Islanders / E. Wagner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 4; p.5-6, 18; Apr. 1939.
A detailed article about the founding of Long Island, through the Dutch perspective. The article also goes into detail about a few specific towns and an anthological perspective on how they lead their lives.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Flushing's Early History / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 10; p.209-210, 212, 214; Oct. 1941.
A detailed article about the founding of Flushing, and it's impact on other local towns. The article details the involvement of Flushing in the Revolutionary War, important figures in Flushing (Long Island) history, with an overview of what made Flushing what it is today.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Jamaica, New York, 1656-1776: Class Structure and Social Mobility / J. Peyer. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No. 1; p.34-47; Fall 1977.
A overview article about the early days of Jamaica, which includes the development of class structures (both white and black), and the development of class movement. Other towns are referenced as examples of Jamaica's infrastructure, comparison of wealth, and overall development.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 1: 1639-1783) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.53-76; Spring 1967.
A chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Some Impressions of Flushing / C. R. Hall. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p.21-32; Spring 1961.
This is an article about the history of the town of Flushing, the village of Flushing, and what has led it to the town of today. It gives a clear reason as to why the town was named Flushing, it's involvement with the Continental Congress, and it notes Captain John Underhill (a known military settler of Long Island) as one of the important figures in the development of the original town.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Flushing Remonstrance / H. Trebor. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 4; p.71-72, 78; Apr. 1941.
A brief article about the founding of Flushing, the early settlers, and the founding of the town government. It discusses the influences the Quakers had on the town, and the influence of John Bowne, a prisoner and well-to-do merchant. An image of Bowne house is shown in the article.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--African Americans
Slavery on Long Island: A Study of Economic Motivation / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.1-12; Spring 1966.
A quick article about the history of slavery on Long Island. Several towns are listed as having been noted in their census for to be slave holding towns. Traditionally, and unlike the south, slaves in Long Island were hose-hold slaves. During the economical changes (early to late 1800s), the slavery was abolished, but slaves were paid next to nothing or nothing at all.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a notation that the church is still an active part of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 3) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.153-155; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Huntington Academy dated in 1825.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
The Inventories of the Estates of Colonel John Youngs of Southold and His Son, John Jr / K. Scott. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p. 37-46; Winter 1966.
An accounting of the estate of Col. John Youngs and John Youngs, Jr. Includes bibliographical information about their travels to various towns across Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Historic Buildings
The John Bowne House at Flushing / E. Wagner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 10; p.7-8, 14-15; Dec. 1938.
A brief article about the history of flushing and the John Bowe House that still exists. The first part of the house was built in 1680, and has remained in primarily the same condition as he left it. John Bowe was a Quaker, and his house has since become a Quaker haven.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Laws
Old Laws of New York / J. Merritt. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.115-116; Jun. 1944.
A short article about the historical laws of New York, with specific mentions of some Long Island towns. It discusses how some laws came into effect, the difference between English and Dutch laws, and how laws changed through out the years.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island University
The Beginning of Long Island University / E. Gatner. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No.1; p.4-33; Fall 1977.
The early years of Long Island University, including the scouting of locations on Long Island, and outside of Brooklyn. Article primarily about the Brooklyn campus, which was the original campus.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Motor Parkway
Long Island Motor Parkway: An Innovative Highway Built for High Speeds / K. Navratil. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.53; Oct. 1984.
A detailed notation of the history of the Long Island Expressway, from it's conception to it's modern state. It discusses the Vanderbuilt involvement in building the road, racing on the roadway, and how it became known for it's high-speed usage.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part 1) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.40-49; Spring 1963.
A short article about the pirates that ran the waters between Long Island and other parts of the world. The most famous pirate noted is Captain Kidd, whom was friends with the wealthiest family on the island, the Gardiners. He traveled to several towns in Long Island, picking up or dropping off his treasures as he chose.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
From the Domestic to the Public Arena: Long Island in the U.S. Sanitary Commission / S. Roff/D. DiMartino. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.161-177; Spring 1999.
A brief article about how women influenced the 1860's sanitary commission in Long Island. It started in Brooklyn, but expanded to the rest of the island during the Civil War.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Train's Meadow
Old Woodside / V. Seyfried. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.31-39; Spring 1963.
The founding of the town of Woodside, and the surrounding areas. It goes into detailed history from the early 1600's to the late 1800's. It names some important people in the founding, and discusses how the road system was laid out.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Flushing's Early History / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 10; p.209-210, 212, 214; Oct. 1941.
A detailed article about the founding of Flushing, and it's impact on other local towns. The article details the involvement of Flushing in the Revolutionary War, important figures in Flushing (Long Island) history, with an overview of what made Flushing the town it is today.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Jamaica, New York, 1656-1776: Class Structure and Social Mobility / J. Peyer. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No. 1; p.34-47; Fall 1977.
A overview article about the early days of Jamaica, which includes the development of class structures (both white and black), and the development of class movement. Other towns are referenced as examples of Jamaica's infrastructure, comparison of wealth, and overall development.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 1: 1639-1783) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.53-76; Spring 1967.
A chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 1) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 11; p.299-230; Nov. 1940.
A detailed, but brief, article about the founding of Nassau County. It primarily focuses on the politics, governmental issues, and who was involved. The towns mentioned in the article were in relation to county development and home-towns of county leaders.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
The Birth of Nassau County (part 2) / G. Weeks, Jr. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 12; p.255-256; Dec. 1940.
A continuation of the article "The Birth of Nassau County," and primarily focuses on the politics and governmental issues. However, the majority of the article focuses on the people who were influential in developing the county.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Civil War
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dutch
Dutch Were Sturdy Islanders / E. Wagner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 4; p.5-6, 18; Apr. 1939.
A detailed article about the founding of Long Island, through the Dutch perspective. The article also goes into detail about a few specific towns and an anthological perspective on how they lead their lives.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dutch Reform Church
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dutch Reform Church
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a notation that the church is still an active part of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Early Schools
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 3) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 8; p.153-155; Jul. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of the Huntington Academy dated in 1825.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Education
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious education of the population of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Education
Long Island's Earliest Schools (part 1) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.105-106, 118; Jun. 1944.
A detailed article about the first English and Dutch schools that were developed while the island was being settled. The article begins in the late 1600s and ends around 1720. The article goes into details about the education level, the religious impact of education, and the differences between the English and Dutch schools. Image of a small school building.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th of April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--John Youngs
The Inventories of the Estates of Colonel John Youngs of Southold and His Son, John Jr / K. Scott. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p. 37-46; Winter 1966.
An accounting of the estate of Col. John Youngs and John Youngs, Jr. Includes bibliographical information about their travels to various towns across Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--King Manor Association
The King Manor Association / J. Fosdick. Long Island Forum, Vol. 1, No. 4; p.10; Jun. 1938.
A historical building in Jamaica fell into disrepair, causing a committee to be formed to see to it's upkeep.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road, A Most Unique Early History / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.26, 45; Aug. 1984.
A detailed article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road. It gives details similar to previous articles about the Long Island Rail Road, but builds on the idea of it being a unique part of Long Island History.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Long Island Railroad Company
The Long Island Rail Road: Still on Track After Years / M. Smith. Long Island Heritage, [no vol.]; p.28-29, 37; Mar. 1984.
A very long article about the history of the Long Island Rail Road, and how it operates today. A listing of towns and stops are given in the article, through paragraphs.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Long Island University
The Beginning of Long Island University / E. Gatner. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No.1; p.4-33; Fall 1977.
The early years of Long Island University, including the scouting of locations on Long Island, and outside of Brooklyn. Article primarily about the Brooklyn campus, which was the original campus.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Maps
Long Island Triangulated: Nineteenth-Century Maps and Charts of the U.S. Coast Survey / D. Allen. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.191-207; Spring 1994.
An article about 19th century map-making of Long Island by Ferdinand Hassler. Hassler was commissioned by President Jefferson to make a complete and accurate survey of the Shore of Long Island. He used several larger towns as points of references. Images included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Travels
A Trip Through Long Island in 1744 / O. Shaw. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.103-104,117-118; Jun. 1945.
The article is a reproduction from a diary of three passengers who traveled through Long Island. The author of the article does not know who the travelers were, or why they had come to Long Island. They noted each town they stopped in.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Breslau
Breslau's First Thirty Years / L. Frevert.. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 11; p.215-216; Nov. 1945.
A detailed article about the founding of Breslau, now known as Lindenhurst, starting with it's founding in 1870. The article details how the area came to be settled, and how the Indians influenced the foundation of various towns. The article goes through the building of the town, it's impact on the surrounding areas and important figures in the town's history.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Old Woodside / V. Seyfried. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.31-39; Spring 1963.
The founding of the town of Woodside, and the surround areas. It goes into detailed history from the early 1600's to the late 1800's. It names some important people in the founding, and discusses how the road system was laid out.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Steamboats
The Flames of Hell Gate / W. Randel. American Heritage, XXX-6; p.62-63; Nov. 79.
A detailed account of the General Slocum, a steam boat that traveled around Long Island. The boat had several occasions of trouble, the last being a large gasoline fire that killed many of the passengers. Captain Van Schiack was charged for negligence and sent to prison for a short term sentence. Middle Neck is where many of the dead are buried.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--John Youngs
The Inventories of the Estates of Colonel John Youngs of Southold and His Son, John Jr / K. Scott. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 1; p. 37-46; Winter 1966.
An accounting of the estate of Col. John Youngs and John Youngs, Jr. Includes bibliographical information about their travels to various towns across Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1644-1770) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.13-38; Fall 1965.
A chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 1: 1639-1783) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.53-76; Spring 1967.
A chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 2: 1784-1852) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.36-56; Summer/Fall 1967.
A continuation of the chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Architecture
Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects: 1860-1940 / R. MacKay. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.168-190; Spring 1994.
A detailed and long article about the various architecture of the important Long Island towns. It also talks about the development of Long Island in general, especially after wars. The article doesn't go over each town's detail, but rather talks about how different and unique Long Island architectural development is compared to other towns. It also gives a run-down of important architectural figures.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Haviland Mill
Haviland Mill at East Rockaway / L. Elhof. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 1; p.3-4; Jan. 1945.
A detailed but short article about the Haviland Mill, from it's original construction to present day. The article is mostly written in tourist form, detailing the author's experience with the Mill.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
Rock Hall at Lawrence, 1767 / W. Pettit. Long Island Forum, Vol. 9, No. 1; p.3, 17; Jan. 1946.
A detailed article about the Rock Hall homestead, and built by Josiah Martin in 1767. The house is an important part of Rockaway and Hempstead history as it played a small role in the Revolutionary War. The article also discusses the biographical accounts of the owners.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Historic Buildings
Rock Hall, a Royal Manor / E. Wangner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 7; p.5-6, 19; Jul. 1939.
An article about the historic building Rock Hall, in Rockaway town. It does not offer the town history, but rather focuses on the detailed history of the Rock Hall itself from it's building in 1767 to the present.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 1) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.11-13; Jan. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 2) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.11-13; Feb. 1944.
The second part of a very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 5) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.89-90, 94; May. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This article contains more history before coming to the 1936 conclusion.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 6) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.109-112; Jun. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. This discusses the 1700s in more depth, and how the Indians assimilated into European culture.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Indians of North America
The Indians of Long Island (part 7) / J. Morice. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 7; p.131-134; Jul. 1944.
A very detailed article about various Native American tribes and their impact on the first Long Island settlers. The article gives details on what happened to the Native Americans as the Dutch and English settlers moved into Long Island. It also discusses how specific towns have come to be named after the Native Americans that once inhabited them. An article that details the Indians of the 18th and 19th century, the involvement of former President Jefferson, and some notations about the Indian languages.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
And the History Goes 'Round & 'Round / T. Waitkins. American Heritage, XXXI-1; p.75-76; Dec. 79.
(Book Review) A very small notation about that uses a photographic essay to detail the history of the popular carousels on Long Island. A painting from 1880 shows the Bauerhaus Hotel and it's carousel on Rockaway Beach.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--Maps
History of Long Island Maps / P. Bassett. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.1-24; Spring 1967.
A long and detailed article of how Long Island was originally mapped. The article starts with Giovannni de Verrazzano's 1524 French drawing of Long Island, and continues until 1955, with a modern map by Lockwood, Kessler, & Bartlett (a mapping company). Several maps include specific and important towns, not always in the same location, as done by the French, the Dutch, and the English. Images of maps, and notations of important towns included.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Lighthouses
Beacons For All: A History of Long Island Lighthouses / J. Ruff. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.145-160; Spring 1999.
A short article about the history of Long Island lighthouses. Several key towns, all of which have water-way connections, are noted for being under restoration and repair.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
An Island wide Electric Storm / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.113; Jun. 1945.
A quick article about an electrical storm on August 12, 1895 that destroyed large portions of the island and took lives. Specific towns that had considerable damage is discussed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Old Woodside / V. Seyfried. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 3, No. 2; p.31-39; Spring 1963.
The founding of the town of Woodside, and the surround areas. It goes into detailed history from the early 1600's to the late 1800's. It names some important people in the founding, and discusses how the road system was laid out.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Storms
An Island wide Electric Storm / C. Wood. Long Island Forum, Vol. 8, No. 6; p.113; Jun. 1945.
A quick article about an electrical storm on August 12, 1895 that destroyed large portions of the island and took lives. Specific towns that had considerable damage is discussed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Loading

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

Brooklyn (Kings) County  --  Queens County  --  Other Mentioned Locations  --  Return to the Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Homepage

Other Mentioned Locations

--Pirates
Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933 (Part II) / J. Rattray. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.28-38; Winter 1964.
A continuation of the "Some Pirates in Long Island Waters: 1699-1933" where the author focus the pirates that came after Captain Kidd. These pirates, while minor on a national level, reeked havoc on Long Island they and became famous for their connections with both towns and the wealthy land owners. Captain James Gillam is among the captains listed.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
The '38 Hurricane / J. McCarthy. American Heritage, XX-5; p.12, 13; Aug. 69.
A quick note about the damage caused by the 1938 hurricane.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--African Americans
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Suffolk County in Olden Times (1644-1770) / H. Onderbonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.13-38; Fall 1965.
A chronological listing of the history of Suffolk County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Quakers and Abolitionism
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 03) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.27, 29-30; Feb. 1944.
A detailed article about various homes throughout Kings County, including the individual histories and images of: Hendrick I. Lott House, Jeromus Lott House, and Smokehouse on Lott Farm. The dates of the houses range from the early 1600's to the latest incarnation of the house. All houses are of Dutch influence, and bear Dutch names.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Dutch Houses of Kings County (part 05) / M. Dilliard. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 5; p.91-94; May. 1944.
A detailed article with images demonstrating the very unique architecture from the Dutch settlers in Kings County. The article discusses some of the historical locals and impacts the Dutch had on Kings County. The article also gives the history of the houses that are pictured: Van Pelt-Woosley House and the Remsen House, as well as a map of Gravesend. Some of the houses have existed since 1600s and 1700s.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Flushing's Early History / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 10; p.209-210, 212, 214; Oct. 1941.
A detailed article about the founding of Flushing, and it's impact on other local towns. The article details the involvement of Flushing in the Revolutionary War, important figures in Flushing (Long Island) history, with an overview of what made Flushing what it is today.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Jamaica, New York, 1656-1776: Class Structure and Social Mobility / J. Peyer. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No. 1; p.34-47; Fall 1977.
A overview article about the early days of Jamaica, which includes the development of class structures (both white and black), and the development of class movement. Other towns are referenced as examples of Jamaica's infrastructure, comparison of wealth, and overall development.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Manhasset Highlights / D. Grant. Long Island Forum, Vol. 4, No. 5; p.97-98, 100; May. 1941.
A brief article that focuses on the founding of Manhasset, and the Dutch influence from it's founding in 1643 (approx). It also focuses on the influence the town had on the surrounding areas. It discusses the Dutch Reformed Church, the "White House," and the first school building of the area. Other information includes the town's first newspaper, and other historical information.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 1: 1639-1783) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.53-76; Spring 1967.
A chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a notation that the church is still an active part of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Dutch
Dutch Were Sturdy Islanders / E. Wagner. Long Island Forum, Vol. 2, No. 4; p.5-6, 18; Apr. 1939.
A detailed article about the founding of Long Island, through the Dutch perspective. The article also goes into detail about a few specific towns and an anthological perspective on how they lead their lives.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Midwout
A Village Called Midwout / M. Dilliard. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.6-24; Fall 1974.
A detailed article about a lost town of Long Island, known as Midwout. The article discusses the Dutch settlement, the attempted annexes by other towns, and it's eventual development into becoming part of Flatbush. Other towns are listed in the article as influences on how Midwout was developed, run, and political base.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Pirates
The Rise and Fall of a Myth: Land Piracy on Long Island / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 2; p.24-35; Summer/Fall 1967.
A quick article about the shipwrecks off Long Island, and the pirates that plundered the sea. Detailed accounts of how various towns were involved in piracy, as well as notations on visits by such famous pirates as Captain Kidd.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Slavery
Slavery on Long Island: A Study of Economic Motivation / R. Ireland. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 2; p.1-12; Spring 1966.
A quick article about the history of slavery on Long Island. Several towns are listed as having been noted in their census for to be slave holding towns. Traditionally, and unlike the south, slaves in Long Island were hose-hold slaves. During the economical changes (early to late 1800s), the slavery was abolished, but slaves were paid next to nothing or nothing at all.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Vikings
The Vikings on Long Island / F. Pohl. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 4; p.1-8; Fall 1966.
A historical account of the landing of Vikings on Long Island, dating from the 1400s. He induced some biographical accounts of Leif Karlsefni, a famous Viking. The author lists several towns that played an important role in in Karlsefni's mapping of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Culture
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious teaching of the people of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Steamboats
Some Recent Steamboat Disasters on Long Island Sound and the East River / E. Dunbaugh. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.1-14; Summer 1966.
A quick article about the steamboat accidents over the last 100 years, and describing what happened to cause them. It also re-evaluates the accident of General Slocum, which was lost after 3 large accidents. The article primarily focuses on New York City.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Creating a New County: Nassau / E. Smits. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 2; p.129-144; Spring 1999.
The history and creation of Nassau County, with slight notations on the formation of Queens County as well. Towns are noted as having had an impact on how the county was founded. Information dates back to 1784.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Flushing's Early History / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 3, No. 10; p.209-210, 212, 214; Oct. 1941.
A detailed article about the founding of Flushing, and it's impact on other local towns. The article details the involvement of Flushing in the Revolutionary War, important figures in Flushing (Long Island) history, with an overview of what made Flushing what it is today.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Jamaica, New York, 1656-1776: Class Structure and Social Mobility / J. Peyer. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 14, No. 1; p.34-47; Fall 1977.
A overview article about the early days of Jamaica, which includes the development of class structures (both white and black), and the development of class movement. Other towns are referenced as examples of Jamaica's infrastructure, comparison of wealth, and overall development.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Life of The Early Islanders (part 2) / N. Howell. Long Island Forum, Vol. 6, No. 3; p.45, 46-47, 57-58; Mar. 1943.
A very detailed article about the beginnings of Long Island. The article describes the founding through present day. The second part of the article focuses on the later part of the 1600s through the late 1800s. It also focuses on the governmental and architectural uniqueness of the town.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Newton 300 Years Old / [No author]. Long Island Forum, Vol. 5, No. 4; p.68; Apr. 1942.
A very brief article about the 300th anniversary of the founding of Newton in Queens County. The article features an image of the town center.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
Notes on the History of Queens County (Part 1: 1639-1783) / H. Onderdonk, Jr. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 7, No. 1; p.53-76; Spring 1967.
A chronological listing of the history of Queens County, but only using larger and well known towns. Depending on date, and how much information was available, some listings are more detailed than others.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--African Americans
Blacks on Long Island: Population Growth in the Colonial Period / H. Wortis. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 11, No. 1; p.35-44; Fall 1974.
A statistical evaluation of the African American population on Long Island during the Colonial period of America. The statistics are primarily broken down by county, but some towns are listed with specific numbers.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 1) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 8, No. 2; p.1-16; Summer/Fall 1968.
A short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Church history
The Formative Years of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island (Part 2) / G. de Jong. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 9, No. 2; p.1-20; Winter/Spring 1969.
A continuation of the short article about the history of the Dutch Reformed Church on Long Island. Includes how, when, and by whom the church was founded. It also give a brief history of the founding of each location of the church. The article ends with a notation that the church is still an active part of Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Culture
Literary Culture on Long Island, 1640-1700 / C. Auser. Journal of Long Island History, Vol.4, No. 2; p.19-25; Spring 1964.
A short article about the education and religious education of the population of Long Island. Some towns are noted as having made special strides toward religious education.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--George Washington
George Washington and Long Island / K. Stryker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 1, No. 1; p. 8-21; Spring 1961.
President George Washington scheduled a tour of Long Island from the 19th of April 1780 to the 24th of April 1780. He stopped in many towns, and stayed over in quite a few of them. He kept a journal of when and where he stopped, of which towns he drove through, and of famous places.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
--Sanitary Commission
Brooklyn and Long Island Sanity Fair: 1864 / H. Styker-Rodda. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 4, No. 1; p.1-17; Winter 1964.
During the midlist of the Civil War, women in Brooklyn and New York City held Sanitary fairs to raise money to aid the families of those fighting. Many towns on Long Island held smaller versions of the Brooklyn and New York Sanity Fair, and they each raised a substantial sum of money.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
Old Laws of New York / J. Merritt. Long Island Forum, Vol. 7, No. 6; p.115-116; Jun. 1944.
A short article about the historical laws of New York, with specific mentions of some Long Island towns. It discusses how some laws came into effect, the difference between English and Dutch laws, and how laws changed through out the years.
Illustrations or Maps: Yes
 
--African Americans
Friends in the Spirit: African Americans and the Challenge to Quaker Liberalism, 1776-1915 / L. Day. Journal of Long Island History, Vol. 10, No. 1; p.1-16; Fall 1997.
The history of Quakers on Long Island. The primary focus of the article is on Quaker involvement in abolishing slavery on Long Island, as well as the work in helping slaves escape. The article also describes how Quakers have influenced various towns on Long Island.
Illustrations or Maps: No
 
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Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Periodical Index Arranged by Location

Nassau County Glen Cove  --  Hempstead  --  Long Beach  --  North Hempstead  --  Oyster Bay

Suffolk County Babylon  --  Brookhaven  --  East Hampton  --  Huntington  --  Islip  --  Riverhead  --  Shelter Island  --  Smithtown  --  Southampton  --  Southold

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