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Archives and Special Collections: Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection - Home

Archives and Special Collections is a repository for materials contained in a variety of formats: books, manuscripts, correspondence, journals, photographs, posters, maps, original drawings, theatre programs, archival documents, and other materials.

Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection

This invaluable library of books, periodicals, pamphlets, maps, historical documents, letters, flags, and other materials, was generously donated to Long Island University by the Cedar Swamp Historical Society under the auspices and direction of its former President, John G. Peterkin. Of the more than 1,100 books, the subjects range from town histories and biographies of Long Island personages (as Theodore Roosevelt) to monographs on Long Island archeology and the Long Island Railroad, from many books on Long Island shipping and family histories to writings by Long Island poets and novelists. We have an extensive collection of Christopher Morley, an important Long Island writer. There is a large collection of books and pamphlets concerning Quaker life, history and thought.

The collection boasts such treasures as 18th century Long Island founding families' letters and deeds, 19th century illustrated song sheets, Civil War newspapers and posters, historic 18th and 19th century maps as well as 19th century atlases, poems in manuscript by Long Island poet John Howard Payne, and several Revolutionary War documents. These latter documents, one of which depicts the British forces before the Battle of Trenton, were displayed in 2000 at the Nassau County Art Museum, along with a number of period flags. The collection includes over a dozen boxes of historic documents that delineate and chronicle the political and legal battles fought to preserve the environmental and historical integrity of Long Island's North Shore.

The Cedar Swamp Historical Society's Collection contains many periodical titles. There are extensive holdings in such scholarly history journals as The Long Island Forum, The Journal of Long Island History and the Nassau County Historical Journal. The Long Island Railroader provides a primary source for a regional focus on an important Long Island means of transportation. Historic Preservation, published by the National Council for Historic Sites and Buildings, and The Conservationist, published by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, contain invaluable insight and information concerning environmental and historical preservation issues and controversies.

We invite all questions and welcome you to visit this Special Collection.

Periodical Index of Long Island Articles Arranged by Location

Long Island, stretching some 120 miles from New York City into the Atlantic Ocean, is divided into four areas: Brooklyn, Queens, Nassau and Suffolk. Within these groupings are a myriad of towns and villages, communities large and small, past and present. They are replete with histories, legends and traditions, hidden lore, persistent mysteries and local characteristics that continue to stimulate researchers. The following annotated list of articles in periodicals demonstrates the variety and depth of information available.

The Cedar Swamp Historical Society Collection Website Project

The Digital Initiatives Department has made images of many of the items available online.

18th-20th Century Historical Letters Finding Aid

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
1 Letter:
4 handwritten pages
1 envelope
December 7, 1862 Letter to Hon. John M. Williamson from Lt. Thomas L. Seabury of Norfolk, VA regarding the removal of Gen. McClellan and criticism of radicals in the North.

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, June 25, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 8 Thomas L. Seabury letter

Norfolk Va
Dec. 7th 1862

Hon. John M. Williamson

                                        Dear Sir - No doubt an epistolary communication from me will occasion you some surprise; but the truth is, I feel that an item or two from within the lines of the army cannot but be received with some interest by one so fortunate as to he honorably exempt from a participation in a strife which seems to forbode the destruction of a nation rather than ensure the reconstruction of a beneficent government. To your sage observations in times past, I am indebted for a great deal of information concerning political affairs: and in writing you a few items of the times and my opinions of events now transpiring I am activated by a desire to communicate with an old friend, in the old way; and I rely upon you to absolve me from an intention of becoming presumptuous.

          The one question of the times is not now, as a few months since : - "When will we have peace?"; but rather : - "What will be the end?" In defiance of the prevailing sentiment of the people at the north, the radicals seem bent upon driving affairs to their own destructive issue. The future will convince the world that the removal of Genl. McClellan was a wanton sacrifice of the country's good to their visionary schemes. If the removal of McClellan should result in the permanent substitution of Burnside, then McClellan might be sacrificed upon their altar of fanaticism with less harm to the country, for Burnside is a good Gent; but such is not the programme (in the general opinion of the army).

          The God whom these people worship is eventually to be given the command of the army if it is in the power of the administration to place him there. As a first move the people would not have countenanced the substitution of a Cromwell for a Washington, they saw that that the North must bury all internal differences to ensure their success and they accepted Burnside with scarcely a murmur. That was one step down the ladder in the direction of radical views. The next step will be from Burnside to Hooker or some other general and the next from him to Fremont who is the military and political exponent of their creed. There is not another round in their ladder or they would go to the bottomless pit for a leader. The people would not put up with being humbugged all at once, but will submit to it with a grace if administered by degrees.

          The army, from long habits of discipline may be said to have become - for all intents and purposes - a regular army: and whatever may be the political views of those composing it, they will conform to discipline from habit, obeying their leaders implicitly. With such a mighty but tractable power within the grasp of visionary schemers one may well ask with "fear and trembling" "What is to be the end?" At present there is every indication that the Army will do nothing in front of Fredericksburg. That is not the way to Richmond; and if it were, it would avail nothing, for the same impediments are thrown in the way of Burnside that were made to fetter the movements of McClellan and so it will ever be until the radicals have everything their own way- You need not be at all surprised to see the whole army soon travelling back to the peninsula...to reach the Confederate Capitol by way of James river and an advance from Suffolk. In my judgment it is the only feasible route; and if such a sensible course should happen to be pursued at the eleventh hour by the administration and ^result successfully what a beautiful commentary it will be upon the military sagacity that induced the removal of McClellan for attempting Richmond by the same road. The rumored overtures of peace by the South is all moonshine and if they can wheedle the administration into the adoption of an armistice for a few months, it will be a brilliant and paying stroke of diplomacy for them, as it will be a means of bringing to an open rupture the now slumbering yet nevertheless divided sentiments of the North concerning peace measures. The people of the South seem to have lost all regard for honesty and principle. If you find a man who avows himself to be for the Union you may rest assured in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred that he is so from a motive of his own. There is no such thing as a Union spirit among them and they have not the remotest idea of entering the Union again on any terms if they can help it.

          With regard to myself I am very pleasantly situated. I have charge of a line of signals from this City terminating in a vulnerable part of our lines, in the edge of the Dismal Swamp. I was sorry not to have seen you while on my visit home and meant to have visited you otherwise I should have taken advantage of the momentary sight I caught of you. Please give my regards to all who take the trouble to remember me.

Very respectfully yours
Thos. L. Seabury
Lt - (?) Actg.-Sig. Officer
Head _(?) Genl. _(?)
Norfolk Va

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
2 Letter:
1 typed page
September 14, 1943 Letter to Jesse Merritt of Farmingdale, NY from Sir Winston Churchill, commenting on a letter of Merritt's shown to him by President Roosevelt regarding Sir George Downing.

No transcription available.
Kept with Theodore Roosevelt Association Collection Churchill letter
Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
3.1 Letter:
2 handwritten pages
July 9, 1850 Letter to A.C. Lynch from John Howard Payne, regarding his efforts to help Lynch claim their grandfather's commutation from the latter's service in the Connecticut Continental Line during the Revolutionary War.

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, July 11, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 8 Payne letter

Irving (?), July 9: 1850..

My dear Miss(?) Lynch,

          My friend Col: Mackay, of whom I have so often spoken to you, received some memoranda from a friend of yours in relation to your claim. He finds that you were mistaken about the rank of your grandfather - "Ebenezer (F)?ray of the Connecticut Continental Line" was not a Lieutenant but a Lieutenant Colonel, and served to the end of the war. - If the commutation was never paid - and their(?) point cards ascertained from the auditor's books, - it is believed that your claim will entitle you to some fifteen thousand dollar, in all; but, as the fund to which it was chargeable was reverted in trust to the United States, you will be obliged to petition Congress to direct its(?) being re-newed. A little management will enable this to be done without difficulty. It does not yet appear that you can derive advantage from any existing law, excepting that for commutation which passed in 1780. -

          Col: Mackay gave me a letter which he requested I would transmit to you for the purpose of obtaining the signature to it of your Senator a member.

J

To
Miss(?) A: C: Lynch

If asked from the (?) auditor to be informed whether your grandfather ever obtained his Commutation Certificate? - To save you trouble, I have taken the liberty to attend to the letter myself. It has been signed by the Hon: Truman Smith, Senator from Connecticut, and it will be sent in forthwith.

          Earnestly I hope that the agreeable prospect thus dawning, will be realized. Col: Mackay promises to see that you are put to no expence in the pursuit of your object.

          Though I am not much, either of a (?) or a gad-a-bout, I can move readily enough where effort promises to be serviceable, and in the present case I shall do so with more than ordinary pleasure, as will my friend. - So do not hesitate unreservedly to command both Col: Mackay and

My dear Miss(?) Lynch
Yours very respectfully
and faithfully

John Howard Payne.

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
3.2 Manuscript:
1 handwritten poem
nd Poem entitled "Fable the Ninth: The Swallow and the Butterfly."

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, July 11, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 8 Poem letter

Fable the Ninth

The Swallow and the Butterfly


A Swallow alighting hard by
          The bells of a flower in full bloom
There gazed at a large butterfly
          And the beautiful tints of its plume;

Its gay color'd wings bright as gold;-
          Its back as with silver emboss'd;-
But its quadruple wings to behold
          Excited her envy the most;

And she said to herself, "It is true
          "I traverse the wide world around
"With my wings, - and I only have two, -
          "But, alas! Often fear getting drown'd;

"For, Oh! What fatigue I sustain
          "When crossing a boisterous sea! -
"But had I four wings, it is plain
          "The toil would be easy to me."

Here, seeing the Butterfly try
          With four wings to winnow the air
But being unable to fly
          And resting now here and now there

With itself highly pleas'd - "Hence I know
          "From this failure of flight" said the Swallow,
"The gew-gaws that make a great show
          "Are mostly superfluous or hollow.

"Not all things that valued appear
          "(?) substance are so; - since we find
"From a distance when brought to us near
          "They merely for show were design'd.

Too much of a good thing is vain; -
          Hence what we wish most to possess
Might prove a great ill in the main, -
          Or bring with it grief and distress.


                                        Fable the Tenth.

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
3.3 Manuscript:
1 handwritten page
nd Letter advertising opportunities for carriage makers to establish themselves in the Hempstead area on Long Island.

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, July 11, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 8 Carriage letter

To Carriage Makers


An opportunity is now offered for enterprising young men who are Carriage Makers, to establish themselves in the vicinity of New York where there is no competition and where the situation promises great advantages for Country as well as City business. Buildings are already erected. Rent cheap - living moderate. For further particulars enquire of (?) E. Haviland at the Rail Road Junction between North & South Hempstead on Long Island Rail Road, or at the office of the Rail Road Company No [blank] Hanover Street, New York on [blank].




Please (?) (?) An (?) Day before you go to (?)utchep Co.

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
1 Letter:
1 handwritten page
May 2, 1899 Letter to H.I. Ines of South Oyster Bay from W.A. Ines concerning common ancestry. No transcription available.

No transcription available.
Map Cabinet Drawer 9 Ines letter
Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location
2 Letters:
2 handwritten pages
1813, 1818 Letters separated into four pieces. Too fragile for display. No transcription available. Map Cabinet Drawer 9
Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
3.1 Letter:
1 handwritten page
September 23, 1814 Letter to Lieut. John Williamson from Stephen Still in which Still asks his help in resolving an issue regarding his attendance at a court martial in Sag Harbor.

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, July 11, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 9 Still letter

          Sept. the 23            1814            Coram

          Sir it is with surprise I received notice of the court martial at Sagharbor & of the necessity of my attending as there is a man who serves in your company as Substitute for me. At the time Capt. Hallock detached the number of men required from his company William Still agreed to answer in my stead and immediately repaired to the post at Sagharbor and says he was received by Capt. Hanes in the form of my selfe and there must be a mistake or William Still has conducted corruptly and deceived me - if it is consistent sir, with your selfe I wish you to write a line to Capt. Benjamin Hallock. Whether it is the latter or the former case I think you would do your _(?) and me a noble favour if he has deceived me in not attending as he agreed. I must and will attend if it is an over sight and I can get notice before the Tenth of October it will save me cost and trouble if you will attend to the above Request and oblige me. I will make what satisfaction you may require for your serveses. From your friend & Humble Servant Stephen Still

Lieut. John Williamson

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
3.2 Letter:
3 handwritten pages
October 27, 1814 Personal letter to Lieut. John Williamson from Mr.Satterley discussing politics and events of the war, as well as the death of a mutual friend.

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, July 11, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 9 Satterly letter

Setauket 27th Oct. 1814

D. Friend

          Your communication of the 22.nd inf(?) I received by Pv. Smith, Am sorry to hear that your expedition could not have been in season to have relieved the cutter if it was practicable, but I am not much disappointed in the result. I have long been of the opinion that such distant expeditions are entirely useless with our present limited means, the time taken to convey you the information with the necessary preparation you will have to make will ever defeat the object. It however answers one valuable purpose by shewing your spirit and disposition to meet the enemy (?) is possible -

          The amount of fines imposed by the court rather exceeded my expectation, but I was agreably disappointed, I have no doubt they richly deserved all the punishment that you inflicted, nothing but the rigorous execution of the law in such cases with will now answer; time has sufficiently shewn that half way measures ought to cease -

          The hour at length a part of a line of Videttes established on the North side, a Cornet and two Privates arrived in this place yesterday, none goes further eastward, Mount Misery was mentioned in their orders as the place of observation but on viewing Old Field Point, they h(?) prefer the latter, by which they avoid a great deal of bad road and have equally as good if not better places for observation. They make Head Quarters at present at Morris, but we shall(?) endeavour to rem(?) them from that place unless their politics should interfere, which I much fear will be the case.

          Shepherd's death was quite sudden, although we had no reason to expect that he would live long from the state of his health at the time and long before he undertook his journey; It is however without doubt that the fatigue he underwent in returning home hastened his death, I have been assisting the connection in arranging his accounts, his debts are large, but John and Gilbert calculate for the widow to remain there if it is possible to save the homestead, but you may rest assured that if sold, it will not fall in the hands of (?). Notwithstanding no means will be left untried by them to accomplish that object - (?) Brewster and E. Woodhue was married on Monday (?), the Judge app(?) to receive on the event, and I make no doubt(?), events he dispose of the other, his health would be materially advanced - I have not received my official communications relative to my military application yet, but from information received from other sources, I have no doubt of success, if the men are raised the idea you suggest relative to something similar for yourself I sincerely wish you might realize, but do not delay your application, make it reasonably and you ^need have no fear of success, halt not between two opinions for now is the acceptable and perhaps the only time -

          The documents lately given to the Public shewing the demands of the enemy, together with the instructions given to commissioners(?) contain important information; Now is the time come that will again try mens souls, the enemy intoxicated with the success he has lately accomplished on the continent vainly hopes that the hosts he has lately let loose on our Northern and Atlantic frontier will bring us to a similar fate, but thanks to the heroes of Champlain and Plattsburgh their ^(?) designs are thus far prostrate(?), our country, our government, and all that is dear to Freeman now call loudly for our unanimous support, let our lives fortune and honor(?) be pledged for their maintenance and security -

Lieut Williamson

Yours with esteem
F. (?). Satterley

Ps An alarm is just given, the Brig sloop and Cutters are off the harbor.

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
3.3 Letter:
1 handwritten page
August 25, 1832 Letter to John Williamson from Sidney Griffon asking that he use his influence in favor of Capt. John Wells as a Presidential Elector during the 1832 Presidential Elections.

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, July 11, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 9 Griffon letter

Suffolk C. H. N.Y. August 25th 1832

Dear Sir -

          At the solicitation of our Jackson and Van Buren Republican friends in this town I write to request you to use your influence in the Herkimer Convention in favor of Capt. John Wells of this town for a Presidential Elector. Capt. Wells has ever been a good and true democrat - has represented us once or twice in the assembly, and is one of our most wealthy and reputable inhabitants. He will stand faithful for the present Chief Magistrate and for Van Buren for Vice President.

          It is not deemed improper to make this request in favor of such a man -

With great respect to
Sidney S. Griffin

To John M. Williamson Esqr.
               Setauket

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
3.4 Letter:
1 handwritten page
September 10, 1843 Orders issued from Brig. Gen. Udall to commanding officers to assemble their regiments at the listed locations and dates. Col. William Williamson named in orders.

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, July 11, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 9 Udall letter

Bridge Hampton
          10 Sept 1843~

Brigade Orders


The several Regiments comprising the 33rd Brigade of Suf county will meet, by Regiment, for instruction & review at the times & places herein-after mentioned - viz-

          Col Cornelius' (137 Right) on Tuesday the 10th of October, at the Inn of J_(?) B_(?) in Commack.

          Col. Williamson's (132 Right) on Wednesday the 11th at R.W. Smith, Coram -

          Col. Hempstead's (107 Right) on Thursday the 12th at Henry T. Plump, Riverhead -

          Lt. Col. (?) (80th Right) on Friday the 13 at R. _(?) in Bridge Hampton -

          Officers commanding Regiments will make the necessary arrangements for carrying this order into complete effect -

By order of Brig. Gen. Udall
Edwin R_(?)
Brig. Ins_(?)

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
3.5 Letter:
1 handwritten page
February 23, 1843 Letter to Col. William Williamson from Mr. Rowley asking him to revoke a fine he received for not appearing at a court martial. Additional statements from Henry R.

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, July 11, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 9 Rowley letter

          Patchouge Feb 23 1843

Col. Wm._Williamson Sir

                                        I have been this day informed by the martial that the late courtmartial laid a fine on me for not appearing at training, his demand for the fine was the first information that I had that I had been returned, as I was not warned to attend courtmartial accertaining that ten days are allowed for appeals after such notice. I hereby appear to your equity to revoke said fine - as I was not notified of said courtmartial and thereby deprived of the opportunity to show good and sufficient cause why I did not appear at training by exhibiting my certificate signed by Capt Howell and Dr Rice based upon oath made before B. Woodhull Esq. that I am deficient in eye sight said certificate bears date Sept 1840.

Lover(?) Rowley


To Col Wm._Williamson Sir

                                        Mr. Rowley has requested me to state to you that he has exhibited a certificate as above stated to me.

          Mr. Rowley states to me before (?) that had (?) certificate but did not present it until the above date. At the time he made the statement I was not satisfied with the occular evidence and returned him.

Yours Respectfully &

Henry Rete(?)

Please to let Mr. Rowley know
your decision on the above}

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
4 Letter:
1 handwritten page
May 16, 1882 Letter to Bishop Potter from Henry Onderdonk Jr. asking the bishop to accept a copy of his studies.

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, July 11, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 9 Onderdonk letter

Jamaica, L.D. May 16, 1882

Bishop Potter

          Right Rev. & Dear Sir,

                                        As you once had jurisdiction over Grace Church in this place I beg you to accept a copy of the studies I have made in the antiquities of this ancient Parish. Though much of it remains in obscurity, yet I think some light has been shed on its early history by my labors - which have truly been labors of love.

With sincerest esteem I remain
most truly Yours.

Henry Onderdonk Jr.

Folder: Item # Item Date Description Location Link to Image
5 Letter:
1 handwritten page (partial)
November 13, 1779 Letter from General Clinton asking that some of his officers be allowed to have their wives and children come to New York and general criticism of the practice of "detaining women and children from their husbands and parents".

Transcribed by Amanda Cintron, MSLIS/Archivist, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, July 11, 2012.
Map Cabinet Drawer 9 Clinton letter

Long Island (?) (?) November 13th 1779

Dear Sir

          I beg leave to inform your Excellency that Capt: McDonald and Capt Trevor late of the County of Albaney Are Now with Me. And agreeable to the law of nature Are Very Solicitious to have thier wives and children Now at Albaney and Scanacaty permit[ed] to come to New York. I have always thought the practise of detaining women and children from thier husbands and parents cruel and opressive and indeed Unnecessary except in some few instances where or when or by whom this unnatural practise was began. I cannot tell but wish it was entirely laid aside. The gentlemen in the Brittish lines profess thier willingness to lay it aside and indulge the Unfortunate the enjoyment of thier connections. I hope the Americans may never be outdone by Aney of the Sons of Adam in acts
[missing]. I therefore beg that if it be
[missing]...that your Excellency would be
[missing]...or aid ladys to come in and the
[missing]...Remove a woefull evel

[missing]...(?) with the greatest esteem your
[missing]...Very humble [missing]
[missing]James M:Clagh[missing]

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18th-19th Century Original Land Based Documents Finding Aid

Folder:
Item #
Item Date Format /
Quantity
Description Location
1 Liquor License 1846 1 Page Board of Commissioners granted resident Newbury Hewlett to sell liquor and wine in his dwelling house. Dated June 8, 1846 Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
2 Will 1841 1 Page Letter written to James Ogden Egan about how he inherited a house from his recently deceased grandfather James Ogden. Dated April 19,1841 Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
3 Document 1695 1 Page A dispute about the boundary line between the towns of Southampton and Easthampton. 14 men, 7 from each side came together to resolve the problem. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
4 Sale of Goods 1825 Folder, 6 Documents Lists of goods sold; such as, tin ovens, wooden bowls and milk pails. Customers names are written on the documents. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
5 Documents 1741-1748 7 Documents White family documents, Southampton. 1741-1748 Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
5.1 Deed 1743 1 Page Ovarian Rogers deeds land to Ebenezer White. The deed mentions that the land is south by the water and north by Capt. Isaac Hager's land. Dated April 7,1743 Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
5.2 Deed of sale 1741 1 Page Isaac Joseph deeds land to James White that was located north of the West Bay near the beach. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
5.3 Deed 1748 1 Page Ezekiel Hallsays was paid 65 pounds by Ebenezer White "for consideration". Deed is an exchange for 22 acres of land named Littleworth. The land is located south of the highway and north near the land of the heirs of Stephen Hornell Pates. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
5.4 Will 1741 1 page Will of Jonathon Raynor to James White. White is to be given 18 shillings. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
5.5 Deed 1747 1 Page Ebenezer White paid Ovadian Rogers three pounds in return for land White received that was east of the highway and south by Widow Hager's land. Dated May 20,1747 Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
5.6 Deed 1746 1 Page Ebenezer White paid Ezekiel Halsey 5 pounds to own one- third part of a lot of meadow land lying on the west side of Red Creek Neck located in Southampton. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
5.7 Deed 1747 1 Page John Sayre gives " one-third part of amendmment number 38 to him (Ebenezer White)". Property was located West bound by Tessups path and east by the highway. Dated May 1747 Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
6 Documents 1770 -1778 5 Documents Documents of the White family of Southampton. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
6.1 Deed 1770 1 Page Ebenezer White and Charles White paid Nehemiah Sayre 32 shillings for "three quarters of a fifty of land" in Red Creek Neck near lot No 1. They were also given meadow land at lot No 27. Dated June 18,1770. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
6.2 Deed 1770 1 Page Silas Ludlam is paid 40 shillings by James White in return for land located on lot No 3 in little south division near the hay grounds. Stephen Halgey M.D. and Joseph Goldsmith signed and witnessed the document. Dated July 19, 1770. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
6.3 Deed 1771 1 Page Charles White sold one half of his land located in No 3 in the little south division lying near the hay ground to James White for 40 shillings. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
6.4 Deed 1778 1 Page James Fanning sold "Quarter and one eighth of a fifty of land" lying in Red Creek Neck in lot No 2 to Ebenezer and Charles White for 40 shillings. They were given additional land westward near lot No 1. Dated Jan 15, 1778. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
6.5 Deed 1774 1 Page Timothy Howell sold Ebenezer White "one fifty" of land in Red Creek Neck in lot No 2. Dated May 26,1774. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
7 Documents 1783-1792 Folder, 9 Documents White Family documents, Southampton. 1783. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
7.1 Deed 1783 1 Page Noah Hildreth sold five acres to William Havens for 23 pounds. Dated December 10, 1783. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
7.2 Document 1783 1 Page James and Mehetabel White are the executors to the estate of Ebenezer White. 41 pounds and 14 shillings are to be given to Ebenezer's three daughters. Sept 6,1783. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
7.3 Deed 1787 1 Page James White paid Lemuel Jennings 15 pounds for land that included a dwelling house with a breeding chain. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
7.4 Document 1791 3 Pages Judge Peter Ogibre of the laid court, states that Isaac Post estate owes 430 pounds, 19 shillings and two pence to James White. Dated April 7, 1791. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
7.5 Deed 1791 1 Page Major James White paid David Hildreth 12 shillings for "one fifty of wood land" in Red Creek between the Creek and lot No1. Dated June 8,1791. Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
7.6 Deed 1791 1 Page James White paid Henry Herrick an unidentified sum of pounds for a "tract of wood land lying in the great south division, south in the lot No35". Dated April 5,1791 Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
7.7 Land Survey 1792 1 Page A survey of Charles White's new land and a statement that mentions that the land contains 92 acres. The survey was executed by James White. Dated January 4, 1792 Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
8 Document 1790 1 Page Abraham Raye, James White and Jonathan Squier moderated a land dispute between Mary White and Lemuel Jennings. The decision found that Jennings had to pay the debt on the land called Deerfield. The document contents mention a division lane between the Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
9 Documents 1799-1805 5 Documents White Family documents, Southampton. 1799-1805 Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
9.1 Deed 1799 1 Page James White paid 14 pounds to Jeremiah Howell for wood land located in the old twenty acre division on lot No16, near "Noyac". Dated February 16, 1799 Map
Cabinet -
Drawer 9
9.2 Deed 1800 1 Page Benjamin Rogers sold James White "a certain piece of wood land being part of lot No88 located in the great south division for 16 dollars and 12 cents". Dated July 24, 1800 Map
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9.3 Deed 1802 1 Page James White paid Isaac Sayre 42 dollars for wood land located in the middle of the division in lot No41. Dated July 3, 1802 Map
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9.4 Deed 1805 1 Page James Lines and Fredericks Lines sold land to James White for 3 pounds. The land is located in the great north division in lot No41. Dated October 4, 1805 Map
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9.5 Deed 1805 1 Page A resident name Elias Gulver mentions that his wife Sarah, Mary Lupton Juneir and Phoebe Lupton are daughters of the deceased Christopher Lupton. They were given half of his land in his will and were now selling the property to James White for 42 pounds. Map
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10 Deed 1742 1 Page is by James White paid Joe Peirson 13 shillings for one fifty of land in the township of Southampton. Dated June 15, 1742 Map
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11 Deed 1743 1 Page Nathan Hildreth is paid 1 pound by Ebenezer White in exchange for a "one-half fifty allotment of meadow at Red Creek". Dated February 25, 1743 Map
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12 Quitclaim 1753 1 Page Elias Cook legally transfered 25 acres of land to James White. Dated 1753. Map
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13 Sale of Goods 1770 3 Pages The document reads " the condition of this vandue [venue] is that whoever purchases shall pay in six months after sale and security to be given if required". The document lists customer names, the products they purchased and the amount each o Map
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14 Document 1775 1 Page First Lieutenant Samuel Barkley is appointed as Military Officer in the Militia by the Provincial Congress for the Colony of New York. Dated October 25, 1775. Map
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15 Document 1783 1 Page Nicholas Schenck wrote a letter to inform the New York Supreme Court that he has selected Morgan Lewis (NY Governor) as his attorney and counsel. Dated October 25, 1783 Map
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16 Land Survey 18th century 1 Page This survey mentions a "record of 20 acres lot No 16 of the lines". There is discussion about the number of poles and their locations on the land. The survey of the property is on the back of the document. Map
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17 Deed 1716 1 Page Nathaniel Halsey paid Blacksmith J. Edward Howell 13 pounds in exchange for one half of a hundred and fifty for a lot of meadow land that is titled "Jumping Creek". Map
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18 Deeds 1718-1729 3 Pages 18th Century Deeds Document Map
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18.1 Deed 1718 1 Page Yeoman Job Wick is paid 20 pounds to give James White 30 acres located in lot No 46. Dated September 2, 1718 Map
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18.2 Deed 1720 1 Page Matthew Burnett and yeoman Thomas Cooper, as executors of the estate of the late John Wick, sell 20 acres by the highway north of Capt. Daniel Hager's land to James White for 36 pounds and three shillings. Dated 1720 Map
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18.3 Deed 1729 1 Page James paid Yeomen William Jennings 19 pounds White for lot No 8 located north east by the highway. Dated December 29, 1729. Map
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19 Receipt 1785 1 Page Nicholas Schenck paid Morgan Lewis 40 pounds for being his attorney to fight an indictment for adhering to the enemy and misleading the aide of the Attorney General and the Clerk of the Supreme Court. Dated January 10, 1785. Map
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20 Document 1764-65 1 Page Top of Document: James White bequeathed: his home, 8 acre lots, 1 1/2 acres in Captains neck, ten acre lots, and all meadow land in Shinnecock to his second son James White (Jr). Bottom of Document: Grandson John White of deceased James White gave Ebe Map
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21 Documents 1750-1769 10 pages White Family documents, Southampton. Dated 1750-1769 Map
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21.1 Deed of Sale 1750 1 Page James White paid Thomas Scott 40 pounds in exchange for 10 acres of land located in the south lot No 33. Dated December 4, 1750 Map
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21.2 Deed of Sale 1751 1 Page Ebenezer White paid John Woolley 25 pounds for " 1 half of meadow in Red Creek Neck bounded East". Dated May 6,1751. Map
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21.3 Bill of Sale 1751 1 Page Ebenezer White paid Charles White 8 pounds and 5 shillings for a certain track of land. Dated September 10, 1751 Map
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21.4 Receipt 1754 1 Page This receipt lists the items Sarah Stanbrough was given by her son John Stanbrough and Ebenezer White, executors of husband's will. The list includes a large table, chairs, iron pot and three sheeps. Dated July 1754 Map
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21.5 Deed of Gift 1762 2 pages Ebenezer White signed a deed of gift to his father James White. Ebenezer White stated that he would provide his father with "bushels of wheat yearly, and bushels of corn yearly and to winter and summer six cattle yearly and winter and summer six shee Map
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21.6 Deed of Sale 1764 1 Page Farmer Jonah Howells is paid one pound by Ebenezer White in exchange for 1 fifty of land in Red Creek Neck located in lot No 1. Dated November 26,1764 Map
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21.7 Quitclaim 1765 1 Page This Quitclaim states that Farmer Jeremiah Howell "by way of exhange firmly sold units to Ebenezer White and Charles White". Howell sold the Whites meadow land estimated to be 2 acres by the side of the creek and 1 acre near the beach. Dated M Map
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21.8 Document 1765 1 Page Ebenezer White and Charles White created a division of meadow land at Red Creek and made an agreement that Ebenezer White would have a piece of meadow land lying east side of Red Creek Neck. Dated October 10, 1765 Map
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21.9 Document 1767 1 Page Daniel Hildreth, Ephrain Hildreth and Samuel Howell are paid 1 pound, 17 shillings and 6 pence in exchange for a certain track of land Red Creek Neck. Dated December 1, 1767 Map
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21.10 Deed 1769 1 Page Charles White and Ebenezer White paid Abner Howells, Josiah Howells, Elias Howells 51 shillings by in exchange for 1 fifty and a quarter right of land lying in Red Creek in the lot No 1. February 23, 1769 Map
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22 Deed 1804 2 pages James White paid Silas Havens 38 pounds in exchange for a certain track of wood land that contained 105 acres. Dated December 5, 1804 Map
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23 Document 1790 1 Page Hugh Smith leased out his Mill Shop and house to Elijah Price for 4 years. Smith stated he would provide the tools for Price to run the clothing business in the Mill Shop and in the end both men would divide the profits equally. Dated August 2, 1790 Map
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24 Documents 1700-1732 5 documents White Family documents, Southampton. 1700-1732. Map
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24.1 Deed 1732 1 Page James White paid 58 pounds to Abraham Howell "for consideration" and in exchange James White is named the executer of the will and given 30 acres of land and a house. Map
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24.2 Deed 1700 1 Page James White recivied 2 acres of land from John Howell. Dated November 23,1700 Map
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24.3 Deed 1704 1 Page James White paid Aaron Burnat 12 pounds in exchanged for 4 acres of land located south of the highway and west by the land of Aaron Burnat. Dated April 24,1704 Map
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24.4 Bill of Sale 1705 1 Page Henry Ludlam, a yeoman, is paid 12 pounds by James White for four acres of land. Map
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29.5 Document 1729 1 Page James White paid Daniel Halsy 13 pounds 10 shillings in exchanged for 30 acres "of a lot of upland ". Dated December 11, 1729 Map
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30 Deed of sale 1745 1 Page David Ludlem, "an inhabitant in Hanover in West Jersey" is paid 50 pounds, 17 shillings and 9 pence by James White. In return, White received a tract of land that is known as "the Milpons". Dated June 4, 1745 Map
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31 Receipt 1784 2 pages Jerusha Havens and Mehatabel Hildreth received 27 pounds from their late mother Mehatabel White's will. 5 pounds were left to pay Mrs. White's debt and 2 pounds were given to James White for handling her estate. Map
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32 Deed 1787 1 Page James White paid Arazina Barnett, widow of Joesph Barnett, 23 shillings in exchange for "one eighth of a fifth right of Cammonage in the town of Southampton running and lying from Easthampton to the Canoeplace. Dated September 1, 1787 Map
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33 Land Grants 1780, 1818 2 Documents Original Documents. Land Grants of Gov. Patrick Henry and President James Monroe. 1780, 1818. Map
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33.1 Land Grant 1780 1 Page Patrick Henry, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, granted Stephen West a certain tract or parcel of land. Dated October 2, 1780. Map
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33.2 Land Grant 1818 1 Page James Monroe, the Fifth President of the United States signed a land grant given to Samuel Smith of Knox County, Indiana. The land given to Smith is said to be located in the territory northwest of the Ohio and above the mouth of Kentucky River. Dated Map
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34 Path Record 1793 1 Page "And all necessary roads & paths are to like as they be for passing roads". Ordered by the town or trustees. Signed by William Herrick. Dated July 18, 1793. Note: Parts of this document are missing. Map
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35 Document 1667 1 Page A drawing of the Matinecock Islands interpreted by the Indian named Sachem. Dated March 22, 1667 Map
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36 Deed 1792 1 Page James White paid Henry Hudson 3 pounds in exchange for "one equal half of a certain tract of land" located in lot 22 in the great north division. Dated December 8, 1792 Map
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Prepared by James Daley
MSLIS, Archivist
October 12, 2012

Constance and Andrew Ippolito Rare Book Collection